The Struggle (for Silence) is Real!

Irony is spending 20 years wondering why your students sometimes struggle to be quiet, and suddenly, in one week, realizing how insanely difficult it is to be silent, AND, that it’s likely your need to talk constantly is part of the reason WHY you went into teaching in the first place!

Last Friday, March 3rd, this ugly thing was taken off my vocal cords.

Before – 3/3/17

And they, like so many other parts of my body, now boast scars.

After 3/3/17

So, I set up for a few weeks out of work, and a week of required silence.  I never actually thought I was ready, which is a good thing.   Because I wasn’t.

I do poorly on twitter,  Rarely could I get out what I need in 140 characters or less.  Absolute silence involved my cell phone in hand at all times.  A few times the thing almost learned to fly, as the fingers, and auto-correct could not keep up with my brain.  But, life lesson number, oh, I don’t know, 4 or 5, teaches us that life goes on around us.  Ready or not.  Even when you have to watch and not participate.

There have been many times since March 3rd I’ve been grateful that thought bubbles do not appear above my head.

On the 9th I headed to the city for my follow-up.  After learning the pathology was benign, and read only “polyp,” I was relieved.  The doctor was pleased with the initial healing and told me I could begin to use my voice.  Slowly.  He said 5 minutes an hour.  That sounded high, based on what the voice therapist had told me in the fall, but I was grateful.  I used the first 5 minutes up asking him questions.

I wanted to know whether this was connected to Cowden’s Syndrome.  I wanted to know if it was likely to recur, if I needed vocal therapy, and when my follow-up would be.

Apparently, kind as he is, he could communicate on Twitter much more efficiently than I.

Cowden’s Syndrome?  I don’t know.  There’s not a lot of literature.  This type of polyp is usually a traumatic event, something you’d remember.  But, you don’t.  And it grew really fast.  I’m not sure.

Recurrence? Maybe.  Depends how it came to be.  Be careful with your voice.

Vocal Therapy?  Suggested.  Start on the 13th.  (Whew… THAT I now KNEW I needed.)

Follow up – April 13th, a few days before I am scheduled to teach my first class post-operatively.

He was an outstanding surgeon.  Matter-of-fact.  Thorough.  Efficient.  But, I’ve known enough surgeons now to know, they don’t play with why.  They just fix it and move on.  He will “doctor” me, to the point that he will follow-up, and hopefully watch NOTHING ever grow there again.  But, in reality this is now just another vulnerable spot on this PTEN mutated body.  Because, I would stake certainty that it’s connected.  There just aren’t that many coincidences in life.

So I left Thursday feeling good.  I got 5 minutes an hour!  I tried out my voice in the car.  I tried it out at home.  And then, I picked up my daughter at school, and I was so excited to talk to her, I easily let the conversation surpass 15 minutes.  oops.

Later when I spoke to my husband I was well past 10 before I stopped.

This 5 minutes and hour thing was not for the faint of heart!

Sometime Friday I decided that stopping at 5 minutes was, nearly impossible for me to regulate.  It was quite possible I could lose my mind.

And then I texted the voice therapist to set up my appointments for this week.  And I mentioned the 5 minutes.  And that I randomly out of nowhere had vomited for 20 minutes that morning.  And her words were crystal clear. “DO NOT SPEAK AGAIN UNTIL I SEE YOU”

Sucker Punch

I went from a poorly managed 5 minutes back to a feeble attempt at silence.

I failed.

I spent 2 full days at a swim meet at with my girl.  7 hours each day away from home.  I got to rest my voice, except when I felt compelled to tell her how proud I was.  Or to wish her luck.  Or to just chat… a little.

Some people really love chocolate.  Me, I don’t mind chocolate, but I LOVE to talk.

We sat in therapy today and I got exercises for volume and pitch… all ironic because I struggle to tell the difference, but I’m an overachiever, so I try to do well.  I sound like a complete loser, but I imagine it’s the same as me attempting something that requires coordination, like kick-boxing, or yoga. My poor vocal cords may not stand a chance.

6 exercises, 5 times each.  Repeat 4x a day.  And during those 4 hours DON’T SPEAK at all.

The revised schedule she gave me had 3 minutes an hour till Friday.  Then, we’ll entertain 5 minutes again.

Tonight I pulled back into my office.  To be silent I must be alone.  I put some “breathe” into my diffuser, and tried to get my thoughts together.

Then I realized they ARE together.  I just have no place to put them.

Tomorrow the house will be full for the snow day.  Normally this would make me very happy.  Tomorrow it is likely to make me a hermit.

Grateful the voice works.  Grateful I tend to heal well….  But, some days

#beatingcowdens

is a real trip!

Silence is… difficult and required

I always hated charades.  I stunk at it.  And I still do.

charades

I would have made a rotten mime.

mime

Forced down time.

That’s what surgery brings.

This time it brings silence as well- for at least the next 5 days.

Emoticon posing like “three monkeys”

I kept moving so fast through the last few months that maybe I chose to ignore the problem growing inside me.  I mean, ignore it in the sense of not writing about it too often.  Of course, I’m not foolish enough to ignore it…

It was last spring, right about this time that I started to feel a little hoarse.  I blamed it on spring allergies.  Except it never went away.

It always struck me as odd because it came at a time during the year I was teaching less, and testing more so there was less of a strain on my voice.

Once spring turned into summer, I had to accept “spring allergies” wouldn’t work.

I searched for an Ear, Nose and Throat doctor in Manhattan, in my network. I read bios, and surgical articles, because everything seems to end with surgery anyway.  So – I find its best to pick a good surgical record to start.  Negative, or realistic?  You can decide for yourself.

The first appointment I met the speech pathologist and the doctor.  Both took baseline screens.  I was told at initial consult in July that there was a “nodule” and a “striking zone lesion” on the opposite side.  I was told it did not seem “typical” of the nodules teachers usually get, and I was told at that initial visit I would likely need surgery in the future.

Healthy image
Healthy image

But, first I was sent to vocal therapy.  And while I scoffed at the idea, I know now how valuable the experience was.  I have always sent my daughter to therapy when needed, and marveled at the success I saw with OT, PT, and Speech.  But somehow for me, it was a tougher pill to swallow.   At first.

I think when I wrote about this last I had connected with the Vocal Therapist, a gem of a woman, and a skilled class act in Speechless – October 2016  And then there was a quick entry here Laugh Out Loud – November 2016,  Basically, the therapy helped enough to reduce the swelling, and reveal more issues.  In October I was told definitively that surgery was in the future plan.  I was told to continue to practice what I had learned in vocal therapy.   I was told to rest my voice when I wasn’t teaching, and to employ a slew of new speech strategies and exercises.  I continued Vocal Therapy through December.  It has been no easy task, and I am FAR from perfect at it, but I can say I’ve made improvements at least a third of the time.  Not too bad for a few months of modifying something I’ve been doing for 42 years!

The kids at school are used to my “tour guide” microphone, which helps me resist the urge to overextend my voice.  We got in a routine, as you do when faced with a new obstacle.  There is no other choice really, because as my friend says, we just “keep swimming.”

The plan was for me to return to the doctor in early April to set up surgery for the summer.

Except plans change.  And it was getting a little hard to breathe.  I felt like I had asthma symptoms more often than I am used to, and almost like a constant feeling of fullness in my throat.

I called the doctor to move the surgery up.  We set February 20th as the date.  Sometimes I just have to trust my instincts.  Except I got a call that the OR was closed on February 20th and I had to take either February 17th or wait till March 3rd.  And for a hot couple of moments I entertained February 17th.  Except that “Jeans for Rare Genes 3” was set for February 19th.  And, me being on total vocal rest while we entertained 120 people wasn’t a great idea.

January 31, 2017
January 31, 2017

I headed to see the doctor on January 31st and he found a new problem.  There was now a very large polyp extending over the vocal cords.  It was big and it had not been there in October.  I asked about the likelihood of it being benign and I was told he was 99% sure it was all benign.  I liked the odds, but still he agreed waiting till the summer wasn’t a great plan.  We settled on a surgical date of March 3rd.  Carefully calculating the number of days I’d need to be off of work before my return, we established it should still work.

Over the last few weeks I felt increasingly short of breath during mundane tasks.  I stayed calm.  I decreased my daily activity and moved a little slower.  I knew we could make it, and we did.

So, “Jeans for Rare Genes 3,” went off as a successful event, and yesterday morning, on the first anniversary of the death of my beloved Pop, I headed to NYU to have my surgery.  I left with the prayers of great friends and family, and the intense protection of one of my Guardian Angels.

The surgery went as surgery does.  It’s strange how it’s not nearly as anxiety provoking as it once was. The whole routine has a wild familiarity, from the intake to the recovery room.  I don’t get lost anymore and anticipate their words and requests.  It’s odd, and a bit strange this job of #beatingcowdens.  I walk dutifully to the OR and get settled under my warm blankets.  I expect the IV, and the burning of the anesthesia.  I know the mask will be the last thing I remember before the recovery room.

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And its amazingly less nerve wracking when the surgery is for you and not your child.

So the biggest polyp had increased drastically in size since January 31st.  It’s gone, and so are the other issues.  We wait on pathology and a follow-up next Thursday.  I’m on strict voice rest until Thursday at least, which requires me to really isolate.  Talking to my family is reflex.  And as I said before I stink at charades.

Before - 3/3/17
Before – 3/3/17
After 3/3/17
After 3/3/17

So we carry our phones.  I put my fitbit on rest. It’s off an in a drawer.  I’ve got my laptop in my room. I’m eating my Isagenix and diffusing protective oils.  I’m organizing my brain- a little.

I’m trying not to get ahead of myself.  I’m trying to address one day at a time.  This is not my strength.  It is in my long term planning that I strengthen my resolve and focus best on

#beatingcowdens.

For now it’s been about a day.  I slipped on about 20 words total.  Not great, but I never claimed to be perfect.  The funny thing about talking is you don’t realize how much you do it till you can’t.

The laughing is even harder.  My husband is funny.  It’s one of the things I love most about him.  How lucky and I as I heal to lament that my daughter wants to talk to me, and my husband makes me laugh?  I’ll hide from my biggest blessings a few more days.  #gratitude