Desperate times…

I took the knee scooter to the mall.

I brought my husband.  Well, technically he brought me.  And he lugged the giant contraption down the stairs and into the back seat of our “big enough for most things, but not this thing” Sonata.

The screen on his iPhone had cracked and he needed to go to Apple.  I needed an outing worse than a puppy who has been crated too long.

He dropped me off at the door.  He rode the scooter through the parking lot to meet me.  Apparently, like so many other things, its a LOT more fun when you don’t need it.

I laughed in spite of myself at the sight of it.  I was also glad our teenager had decided to stay home.  The sight of it all would have likely been just too much.

People stare right at you, while simultaneously judging you as you drive this thing.  The local mall lacks the tolerance of Disney World.  In fairness, from face on, it looks like you’re using wheels for fun.  It’s not until I have passed, if they bother to look, that they would see the giant walking boot resting on the knee pad.

Today is 8 weeks and 1 day since I’ve been “booted” again. 57 days.

I have had more surgeries in my life than I can count.  Not a single one of them kept me down for 8 weeks. This foot has been messing with my life for over 8 months.

Double Mastectomy – back at work in 5 weeks.

Hysterectomy – back in 2 weeks.

I once had arthroscopic knee surgery over a long weekend, and was back on the 4th floor in my classroom the following Monday.

Vascular, over the February break…

Biopsies, a day tops…

We always say recovery pain is the best kind, because you know it’s going away.

And yet the answer to “Does your foot feel better?” still remains “Not really.”

My kind and compassionate local podiatrist, in a combination of frustration at the injury that won’t heal and my insurance company making it harder for him to treat me, has advised a visit to Hospital for Special Surgery.  I’m sitting.  Foot up, phone in hand, waiting to try to schedule.

I rode that knee scooter all over the mall.  I rode it into the grocery store too.  Quite simply, I’m tired of being locked in my house.  It is truly a ridiculous and ingenious contraption.

If you asked me 2 years ago if I would ever… the answer would have been “NO WAY!”

Except if I keep learning anything through these years of life with a rare disease, and also just life, it seems to be” never say never…”

I had a boatload of things I wasn’t going to do as a parent.  I’m pretty sure the first one was undone about three hours in… right after the anesthesia from that c section wore off…

Wasn’t going to… feed certain things, watch certain things, give certain things, etc. etc.  And then you find yourself learning that all the plans in the world are suddenly invalid as you just try not to damage the tiny human.

A great deal of my pride was left behind in the OR where she was delivered.

I lost a bunch more of it through a slew of breast biopsies prior to the double mastectomy in 2012.

The uterine biopsies, the hysterectomy, the “cancer screening” human exams took a bunch more.

And there are few things quite as humbling as a breast MRI of your silicone implants.

I was never “in fashion” but I used to take great care in what I wore.  Things were dry cleaned.  Stockings and heels were worn daily.

Then there was back pain that seemed only better in sneakers.  Coupled with a significant weight loss my wardrobe evolved into jeans, t shirts and sneakers.  May be a dig at my early judgment of “too casual” teachers…

Life, at it again…

If we are open, and able to be introspective, we are changing and growing all the time.

I am in a painstakingly slow process of relinquishing control.  

Control is really largely an illusion anyway.

Faith, trust, hope, and the ability to embrace what the future has in store, these are my current goals.

I’m a work in progress.

So if you see me and my knee scooter, be kind.  You may even see me up and down the block.  These are, after all, desperate times…

We’re done being caged up.  I need some fall air.  I am ready to get well.  Since my foot isn’t cooperating, I’ll start with my mind.

#beatingcowdens

 

 

Behind the Scenes…

We don’t post the awful pictures.  We leave out the ones where we look less than our best.  Social media allows us to live in the delusion that everyone’s life is “perfect.”

I’ll be the first to admit the ugly truth.  It’s far from perfect.  It’s not neat or clean.  There is no bow.  And yes, most of the time I do delete the awful ones.  Those images and experiences are seared into my soul.

I prefer to go with the theory that the body forgets pain…  At least your own.  It’s how we survive.  But, if you live watching a loved one in pain – you know the memory will not slip even a tiny bit.  If you hold your child as they cry out in pure agony, or when they are weak from fever, you can remember where you were each time.  If you watch your teen wince simply through a series of steps, or check to make sure they are breathing as they sleep the better part of two or three days at a clip – you don’t forget.

Recently, Meghan was in a production of “Beauty and the Beast Jr.” with the Staten Island Children’s Theater Association, Inc.  She loves the experience of working with a theater group and has been with this one a few years now.  It is such an enjoyable time in her life.  She spends months of Saturdays with genuine quality people preparing for the show.

Meghan as “Madame de la Grande Bouche”

And during those same months she is thriving academically.

And training for swimming.

And making regular appointments, routine, follow-up, and therapy.

And contending with seasonal allergies that are nothing less than relentless.

And, she is, every single day a person living with Cowden’s Syndrome and the effects it has on her, both physically and emotionally.

The show was almost 2 weeks ago.  It took me a little bit to get my thoughts together.

I think I have it now.

Living with chronic illness, chronic pain, chronic life altering physical ailments, is in some ways similar to putting on a production.

You set your sights on what you want to accomplish – large or small.  In some cases it’s going to a party, and in other’s it’s going to the backyard.  But, you plan for it.  You practice it.  You consider every detail.  You may have to select the right costume and even stage it so you don’t sit or stand for too long.  You know just what your body can do and there is a short window where you have to make it all work.

The rest of the time you are backstage.

You are in pin curls and shorts with a tank top.

You are rubbing your feet.  You don’t have make-up.  Backstage and rehearsals, these are what life is made of.  But, we don’t take the camera out while we are there.

Everyone’s preparation is different.  I can only write about ours and confidently say everyone has some level of preparation before the “show”.  Some people make it onto the stage more often than others.  Some people have fewer performances, but make them count as much as they can.  Those people take nothing for granted because they have no idea when they will step out into the “stage” again.

That’s what social media looks like to me, anyway.  Every picture is on the stage.  Some have more than others.  But, because of the world we live in it is easy to judge based on what we see without considering what we DON’T see.

The night of the show Meghan went to the diner with her friends.  She got home close to midnight.  It was Sunday, and a school night, and I had already decided she’d stay home the next day.  It wasn’t a reward.  It was a necessity.  The amount of energy her body had expended could not be recovered quickly.  She slept until 2pm the next day, and was asleep again by 9.

I sent her to school that Tuesday – ready to roll.  She swam at 5am, did a full day of school, an hour of physical therapy and another 2.5 hours of swim practice.

Probably not the best plan.

The physical therapy is in place to try to strengthen her overall.  Joint laxity, ligaments subluxing… all sorts of cracking, popping and shifting.  The search for answers is on, but in the mean time we do PT…

By Wednesday she couldn’t move.  She made it to school – barely.

Her IEP meeting was that afternoon, and we had lengthy conversations about all sorts of physical and emotional needs relating to school.  We also spoke at length about the service dog we are in a holding pattern waiting for, and how he will fit in to the big picture.  So many questions…

Thursday we got in the car to go to school.  By 7:30 I had her back in her bed.  She just could not.  She slept until early afternoon Thursday, followed it with and early bedtime and slept again until early afternoon Friday.  There was a little less sleep as the days went on but it was a slow process.

The show that was so incredibly worth it in every way – cost her a full week in recovery time.  Her body hurt so deeply.  This is not an out of shape child.  This is a person living with a chronic pain and illness that is affecting her body in ways not even the doctors fully comprehend yet.

But I didn’t post pictures of her wincing in agony, or sleeping for days.

To the outside world she doesn’t look sick.  She’s 5 foot 8, full of muscle and extremely well-rounded.

She works hard at it.

Some days are easier than others.  But every day she works.  She is fierce and relentless and she does not quit.

Next time you catch a photo of her smiling or singing in a pretty dress know that it took a lot of staging to pull that off, and there will likely be a lot of recovery on the back end.

But, she wouldn’t have it any other way.  Not for a moment.  She is my inspiration to remain…

#beatingcowdens

 

Normal People Stuff

Two weeks of as much rest as I can possibly stand.

The trouble with having a rare disease, as I’ve said so many times before, is that you ALSO have real life.  You ALSO have “normal people stuff.”

After that early January fall, I was quite consumed with my shoulder, and pretty bothered by the flippant attitude of my breast surgeon.  All of which still stew inside of me as the real possibilities of breast implant associated illnesses are all over the news this week.

Just one of the many stories this week outlining a possibility. That’s where it begins. With someone saying it “could” be. 

And then there was the new endocrinologist on March 12th.  It was a backwards progression of sorts.  A referral from the surgeon who has been following me since my PTEN diagnosis.  I never really settled into a new endocrinologist after I disagreed with my long standing one in 1998.  He was bothered by my questions.  I bounced in and out of a few.  I found them mostly arrogant and out of touch.  I held with one during my pregnancy in 2003, but ditched him soon after my C-section.  I had a primary running bloodwork, and I was guiding treatment based on my labs until the Cowden’s Syndrome surfaced.

At that point I was handed off to an endocrine surgeon.  The possibility that the half of my thyroid which remained after a partial thryoidectomy in 1993 could fall into the 35% lifetime risk of thyroid cancer that comes along with a PTEN mutation was real.  We agreed on annual follow-ups using the ultrasound in her office.  All was smooth until February 26th, when she saw some calcifications on the ultrasound.  She got spooked and wanted a “fresh pair of eyes.”  She referred me to an endocrinologist in her hospital.

He sent me for a “proper” ultrasound before my appointment.  He then, with some promising knowledge of what a “Cowden’s” thyroid looks like, went through the images from the exam.  He told me that there were some potentially concerning features, but nothing that appeared urgent.  He questioned why I had not been using the formal ultrasound at the hospital, as there was now no baseline to compare it to.  In another episode of wondering why I don’t ask enough questions about my own care, I had to let it pass…

He told me the radiologist would read the ultrasound with more concern than he did.  He was right.  So there will be another ultrasound in August.  We’ll talk about the status of that right thyroid lobe then.  In the mean time he offered me a change of medication that in 30 years on Synthroid no doctor has ever entertained.  Monday I will begin a lower dose of Synthroid combined with a twice a day dose of T3, liothyronine, in hopes that I might get some of my sought after energy back.  With a standing order every 3 weeks to monitor blood levels, at this point, I have nothing to lose.

So back in circle to the “normal people stuff” intertwined in this balancing act.   April 18th is still the earliest day to contend with the chronic ear pain and fluid I’ve been handling since September.  It doesn’t matter that it has headed into my mouth and is bothering my teeth.  That it is somehow messing with the nerves so badly that I ended up with a root canal specialist yesterday.  Of course, she won’t touch the painful tooth because no one can know exactly what is in my ear.  Pain management.  Maybe it’s Cowden’s.  Maybe it’s allergies.  Maybe it’s simple.  Maybe it isn’t.

And then there is that foot. Snagged on a kids chair in a third grade classroom in the middle of teaching a lesson.  It knocked me on the floor.  I was so worried about the shoulder, and the breast implant that I ignored the foot.  At least I tried to.

About 2 weeks after the fall I saw my primary and asked for help.  She suggested an MRI.  GHI promptly denied the MRI and told me to ice and elevate as much as I could, and reevaluate in 6 weeks.  I was left with no choice but to continue a job that kept me more hours on my feet than off.  By March 6th I couldn’t take the pain anymore and headed to a podiatrist.  He evaluated the foot, ordered Xrays, and got them read within hours.  By the next day he had the MRI approved and I went in for the exam.  About 72 hours later I got a call asking me to come in to discuss the results.

That’s never an actual good sign.

So when I walked into the office in two sneakers, I kind of suspected that I wasn’t going to leave in both of them.  And I was right.

MRI revealed a partial tear of the lisfranc ligament in the left foot.  Apparently this is an incredibly rare injury, (insert shock and surprise here) that the podiatrist anticipated before the MRI.  Apparently you can only get this injury through a twist and fall, you know, like catching it on a student’s chair mid-step.

I got a soft cast, and a giant walking book.  I got pulled out of work for at least two weeks, with no idea when the good people who review these cases will approve this as the clear work-related injury it is.

I have another appointment with the podiatrist tomorrow.

There is State testing at work this week. I’m always there for testing.

But right now I’m actually testing my inner strength.  Resting my foot.

I’m preparing for my clearance to return to work.  I’m preparing for my ENT appointment.  I am preparing to get my ear fixed.  I am preparing to get ready to lose the other half of my thryoid.  I am preparing for another plastics consult…

And all the preparing in the world won’t matter.  Because life will come in the order it wants.  That is the lesson for Cowden’s Syndrome and real life…

The dog hair and I will be here until then….

#beatingcowdens

 

Superfluous Tissue

6 years ago I was trembling with fear.  I sat up most of the night.  I paced the floors.  I was scared out of my mind.

No stranger to surgery, this one was way different.

Sometimes I actually forget things.  But, most of the time, especially when it has to do with numbers or dates, I remember.

Six years ago I was only months past the diagnoses of Cowden’s Syndrome Meghan and I had received.  Six years ago I was only learning about the mutated gene with astronomical cancer risks that I had passed unknowingly to my girl.  Six years ago I was reeling with the knowledge that she had nodules on her thyroid, pronounced and alarming.  I was trying to grasp the reality that this life of medical drama that I had hoped would subside, was going to require our vigilance and attention forever.

So, exactly 6 years ago tonight  I was contemplating the overwhelming reality that my newfound breast cancer risk, which exceeded 85% on gene mutation alone, had been coupled with my 8 prior breast biopsies, and my mother’s “survivor” status, and had relegated my surgeon to tell me it was not “if,” but “when” breast cancer would strike me.  When I met her for the first time a few weeks prior she had my chart with her.  She had reviewed it before our consultation, and she cut right to the chase.

“When are we going to schedule your surgery?”

I paused, a little stunned and confused.

“For what?”  I managed to ask.

“Prophylactic bilateral mastectomy.”  She stated simply.  “You will face breast cancer.  The numbers, and your history make it irrefutable.  I think we need to get there first.”

I always travel to my doctors alone, but that is probably one of the few times I actually regretted it.  The room started to spin a bit.  Thankfully, she didn’t skip a beat.

I managed to ask, “when?”

She said, “March 5th.”

I protested.  I asked if we could do it over the summer.  “I am a school teacher,” I told her.

She was kind, but unimpressed.  “March 5th.  My scheduler will help you coordinate with the plastic surgeon.  We will be in the operating room together.”

I was numb.  I called my husband, then my mother.

I drove home, and started to prepare.

I was unsure how I would handle the minimum 5 week recovery.  There were no sick days left for me to pull from.  I had an 8-year-old who had already had multiple surgeries, and I had quite a few myself.  I started to wonder how to plan financially for a leave that would end up being at least partially unpaid.

A dear friend, who will never fully grasp the depth of the gift she gave, donated 25 sick days to me.  The weight she lifted off me was astronomical.

I spent the next few weeks in auto pilot.  We were still handling some new findings on Meghan, and I was reading and processing Cowden Syndrome.  It made me nauseous.

I remember the drive into the city that morning.   I remember walking with Felix.  I remember praying over the phone with my brother-in-law.

I remember repeating over and over to the unbelieving doctors that I would NOT be having tissue expanders, the common course of action with a mastectomy.  The plastic surgeon heard my concerns, and my need to simplify, and to get home without additional surgery.  The knowledge that my child would likely one day walk this road filled me with a sense of urgency to make it seem as simple as possible.  She agreed to do immediate implants.  I lost count of the number of times I explained that.

I remember walking to the operating room, and looking into the comforting eyes of my surgeon before I fell asleep.  “You are very brave.”  And even though she never really gave me a choice, her reassuring smile helped so much.

I remember waking up feeling relieved and empowered.  Not just because the surgery was over, but also because I had gotten out in front.

I remember seeing my husband, and checking on Meg.  I remember seeing my sister and telling her she should be with my nephew.  His birthday happens to be the same day.

I was discharged the next morning – about 28 hours after the surgery.

The next days were painful, and draining.  My mom was with me for a few, to wash my hair, and to chat.  I hated the circumstances but treasured the time with her.

After my mom’s mastectomy following her cancer diagnosis many years prior, she had dubbed the breasts “superfluous tissue.”  I finally understood.

When my pathology came back days later with early grade DCIS, essentially one cm of stage 1 breast cancer, I missed my breasts even less.  We were all surprised, and I was grateful for the knowledge that the cancer was not close to the chest wall and no follow-up treatment would be needed.  I just had to heal.

I had no idea at the time that two months later I’d be back in the hospital for a hysterectomy.  Cowden’s Syndrome does not mess around.

Except, it messed with the wrong family.

We get knocked down, but we get up stronger.

Sometimes I hate that I remember dates.  Other times, maybe it gives me reason to celebrate, and to feel empowered.

I started owning my nutrition 6 years ago.  I have worked on playing strong and fit.  My weight has been stable, and I am proud to be one of the healthiest looking sick people you’ll ever meet.

“superfluous tissue” indeed.

#beatingcowdens

 

 

To My Girl On Her Birthday

Sometimes you’re on top of the world.  Stay HUMBLE.

Sometimes you’ve hit a low.  Stay HOPEFUL.

The Lokai bracelet nailed it with real world advice.

Meghan as you turn 14, there is little more I need to tell about our back-story.  Anyone who wants to know whatever we are willing to share, need only look through the posts on this page.

Tonight my thoughts are on moving forward.

You’ve seen some low lows these past years.  But, you have also been blessed with some very “high” highs.  You are no stranger to struggle, but you are also well-acquainted with overcoming any obstacle, large or small, even if they are thrust repeatedly into your path.

You are true to yourself at all costs, a rare quality in a teen these days.  And while you wrestle with normal questions, I can tell you that your values, developed through your own processes, are strong and logical in that complex brain of yours.

We spend a lot of time together- more than most mothers get with their daughters.  And, while I am not a fan of the medical circumstances that cost us hours on the Belt Parkway, the Gowanus, the BQE, and the FDR, I am so grateful for the HOURS we have to talk.  About everything.  I am grateful that we have learned a mutual respect, and have even (almost always) safely figured out ways to agree to disagree.

The person you are impresses me.  And not just because I am your mother.  You have worked through adversity your entire life, and you have become stronger, wiser, introspective, and compassionate.

You have learned you actually enjoy (many) people.

You want to help others who have lived lives full of struggle.  And you will.

All of this will shake out with its details in the years to come.  But I want you to always remember this:

Your recent PTSD diagnosis was not a shock to either of us.  Nor is the “head-on” way you are meeting the challenge of learning more about yourself.  You will not sit back.  You will not let life happen with out you.  You will always persevere.

 

You my dear are taking that same pressure that can burst pipes, and you are “making diamonds.”

As you face the year ahead, and you look at the new adventures you will undertake in High School, move forward with the knowledge simply that the past happened.

And now – It’s the present.

While some things will always remain the same, some things will change all the time.


Learn. Grow. Laugh. Take risks.  You might get hurt, but you also are likely to have some of the most magical experiences of your life.

Set goals.  Carry them through, and when you need to – modify and reset.

I will be forever nearby, your cheerleader, and your guide on the side.

We are

#beatingcowdens

TOGETHER.

The days are sometimes long, but the years are short my love.

Savor them. I know I do.

Happy 14th Birthday!

The Comeback…

“…There is no mountain you can’t face

There is no giant you can’t take

All of your tears were not a waste

You’re one step away…” Danny Gokey

We listen to a good deal of Contemporary Christian music.  There are other tastes among us, but often, especially in the car – we listen to this.  It’s been a few years since we’ve had a church where we all felt comfortable and at home, although we possess strong, deeply rooted faith.  This music helps keep us focused when things can otherwise seem blurry.

This particular song surfaced a few weeks ago.  Meghan was battling to make a comeback from knee surgery 7, and seven was NOT a lucky number.

When you’ve been through the operating room 18 times and it’s still a week before your 14th birthday – you can call yourself somewhat of a professional at recovery.

We left the hospital with our list of directions.  We went to the surgical follow-up.  We scheduled PT.  We even held an extra week before restarting swim.  There were crutches for a very long time – used responsibly.  So, when she had done everything right, and her body decided to push back – hard, she was understandably angry and very frustrated.

No one really had a solid explanation for the fluid that overtook that knee almost 5 weeks post operatively.  But, there never really is a solid explanation.  I’d like to say we’re used to it.  But, I don’t like to lie.

There were more crutches, and more PT with the BEST PT in the whole wide world.  (We LOVE Dr. Jill – because she works on the WHOLE kid.  She gets that they are more than the body part giving them trouble. I know of NONE quite like her.)  There was increase in strength and range of motion.  There was a return to (half) swim practices.

There has been diligent icing after swim.  There has been stretching and strengthening because, quite frankly, she WANTS to feel better.

We joked around during the month of June, how nice it would be if we could make July a “doctor- free” month.  We longingly imagine the same scenario every year.  What if summer could be time to relax?  What if we could take day trips?  What if we could come and go, and rejuvenate?

I just counted 20 medical appointments between us over the last 31 days.  There are 2 more tomorrow.

Chronic illness is a real drag at any age.  When it happens to a child or a teen it makes everything that is already hard about growing up – even more of a challenge.

When you are in an almost constant state of recovery, you can find yourself tired.  Fighting so hard just to get back to where you were can make you feel like a hamster stuck in a wheel.

Chronic illness, constant pain, surgical recovery, ongoing surveillance, and all the other “fun” things that accompany Cowden’s Syndrome – or any other “it’s sticking around FOREVER” illness can leave you wiped out.

It’s hard to build relationships, friendships, or even a social group when you aren’t able to do so many of the things people take for granted every day.  There are days you quite simply run out of “spoons.”

https://butyoudontlooksick.com/articles/written-by-christine/the-spoon-theory/

But, in life there are more times than not that we have choices.  I try to model for my daughter, but so often she models for me.  You can choose to sit alone.  You can choose to let pain, fear, anxiety and frustration take hold.  You can choose to be sad.  You can choose to be mad.  Or you can realize that life is hard.  Everyone’s life is hard.  Life is also full of blessings.

When you realize that this is your life, and you decide you’re going to make the best of it- that’s when you dig in. You climb up that mountain, one step at a time…

I admire many things about my daughter.  She is not perfect – neither am I.  But in her soul, there is a “Never Give Up” attitude that permeates all things.  There is a constant quest for equity and justice, not just for her, but for all she interfaces with.  There is a compassionate need to help others.  There is a desire to be successful in spite of her circumstances – not because of them.

She always says she loves to swim because regardless – she has to meet the same time standards as everyone else.  Somehow it makes each comeback a little sweeter.

No one else would likely know, or realize, or remember.  But, we know.

First year on the high school team.  The season starts right after school.  She’ll be ready.

That’s why we will always remain

#beatingcowdens

 

“…There is no mountain you can’t face

There is no giant you can’t take

All of your tears were not a waste

You’re one step away…” Danny Gokey

This video is worth your time…

 

Danny Gokey – The Comeback 
After a season of nightfalls and pushbacks
After the heartache of wrong turns and sidetracks
Just when they think they’ve got you game, set, match
Here comes the comeback
Just cause you laid low, got up slow, unsteady
Don’t mean you blacked out or bought out you’re ready
Just when they think there’s nothing left running on empty
Here comes the comeback
(chorus)
This is your time, your moment 
The fire, the fight, you’re golden
You’ve come so far keep going
Here comes the comeback, comeback
You feel the lightning, the thunder, your soul shakes
Under the roar of the heaven, the tide breaks
And from the ashes you will take your place
Here comes the comeback
(chorus)
This is your time, your moment 
The fire, the fight, you’re golden
You’ve come so far keep going
Here comes the comeback, comeback
There is no mountain you can’t face
There is no giant you can’t take
All of your tears were not a waste
You’re one step away
Just when they think they’ve got you game, set, match
Here comes the comeback
(chorus)
This is your time, your moment 
The fire, the fight, you’re golden
You’ve come so far keep going
Here comes the comeback, comeback

It’s Not Over Yet…

Tonight my search for perspective was harder than it normally is.

Tonight I needed a glass (or two) of wine, some time alone in my office, and plenty of music.

And as the lyrics roll through my head in the eclectic mess that spans, Contemporary Christian, Classic Rock, and some alternative memories from back in the day, I somehow start to find myself again.

I am generally a very positive person.  I am able to find blessings in unlikely and hard to reach places.  I make a point of focusing on these things for so many reasons.  Primarily, I find it is necessary to be positive for my health.  While I don’t believe a positive attitude alone will cure illness, I do firmly believe a negative one, or a constant state of stress and worry can worsen illness.  We certainly don’t need that.

But, lately I’ve been frustrated.  I’m even a little angry.  You see – everything is NOT fine.

And I’ve been avoiding my computer because I’d rather write when my perspective is in its proper place.  One of the reasons I love to blog is because I can get right in my head by the time I’m done.  I can typically work through whatever is gnawing at me.

There are drafts in my folder.  Unpublished, unfinished work.  I’ve tried, but I’m struggling.

Logic leads me to retrace the obvious.

In our house the diagnoses came about five and a half years ago.  I was 38 and Meghan was 8.

In most of the people I’ve interfaced with who have Cowden’s Syndrome, their diagnosis is less than 10 years old.  I know there are others, but this is the majority.

There is a growing group of us who are parents.  Now, in my case, my diagnosis was made BECAUSE of Meghan’s.  But, in many cases the opposite is true.  There comes a point where the signs are either apparent, or subtle, and something prompts the formal diagnosis of PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndrome, in some form, in our children.

Anecdotally, we are not the only house where the syndrome seems to manifest worse a generation down.  This is a story I have heard many times.

There is a special kind of knot that forms in your stomach and lingers, forever, when you realize that you are somehow responsible, in an unintentional, yet undeniable way.  Your child has this syndrome because, even with a current estimate of a 1 in 200,000 diagnosis it is an autosomal dominant condition, which means that if you have the mutated PTEN gene, 50% of the time, it will pass to your child.

Between us, since Meghan was born in 2003 there have been 30 or more trips to an operating room.  On 18 of those visits I have watched my girl head into surgery.

And I know all the blessings bestowed upon us.  I know the beauty of benign biopsies, and the gratitude of legs that allow for walking when the alternative has certainly been possible.  I know the strength and resilience of my daughter, and the grace of God alone.  I know the grit of a child just out of her 7th knee surgery who understands the recovery process better than any PA she will meet in the surgeon’s office.  I know the feeling of bruises on my knees as I give thanks for my child who is ABLE to recover.  I get it.  I truly do.  I’m grateful.  I am.

But, you know what else?  Sometimes I get angry.  And, that’s OK too.

I’m learning that part of being able to be positive is allowing myself to FEEL and WORK THROUGH ALL the emotions that come my way.  Even the ones that hurt.  Even the ugly ones that don’t have flowers and rainbows attached.

This is reality.  This is our reality.  And I am not about comparisons.  I do not profess to understand anyone else’s reality any more than I could expect them to understand mine.  I do not use words like “worse” or “better” or “harder” or “easier” or “fair” or “unfair.”

What I can tell you about our reality is that 18 is too many surgeries for a 13-year-old girl.

I can also tell you there will be more.  For both of us.

Vigilance, a necessary reality to keep us in front of the astronomical cancer risks associated with Cowden’s Syndrome will lead to more surgery.  And we will hope and pray each is followed by a benign biopsy, or an encouraging word from an orthopedic surgeon trying to preserve a knee damaged by a mischievous AVM.

When I got my diagnosis, I was almost 40.  I was married.  I had a little girl.  I had a home.  A career.

When my girl received her diagnosis she was in 3rd grade.

Swallow that.

It doesn’t taste very good.

Cowden’s Syndrome is isolating.  In addition to numerous food issues, and immunological issues, and significant knee trouble (understatement of the year,)  there are SO MANY doctor’s appointments.  There are countless blood draws.  There are so many days I pick her up at school and we do ANOTHER 4-5 hours round trip in the car, traveling to NYC, sitting in traffic, parking, waiting, sitting in more traffic…

As connected as social media can help you be, there is a lack of connectedness that is inherent with not being there.  Being absent.  Being unable to go on certain trips.  Being unable to do the things kids your age can do…

When I was a child I always “knew” something was wrong with the ridiculous number of surgeries I had, but it was different.  It was not the same as knowing for sure that your genetic mutation was going to guide portions of your life whether you like it or not.

When you have one thing wrong, whether you break an arm, or have your wisdom teeth out, or your tonsils, people seem to know what to say.  When you constantly have something wrong, some type of surgery, or some type of recovery on the agenda, it gets harder for everyone.

People don’t know what to say.  So they don’t…

Cowden’s Syndrome can be very isolating.

What about our children?  What about our children who are being diagnosed younger and younger?  To some extent, yes, “Knowledge is Power,” but at what cost?

We are forced to make the logical choice for necessary screening appointments, and often surgery, while often having to skip social, cultural, or sporting events.

We are forced to say no to social engagements so often, that people forget to keep asking.

Our youngest children at diagnosis may not fully understand the scope of what is now their’s.  But, they will.  If they have a parent with the same syndrome they will watch.  Everything.  If they are the first in the family they will piece it together.  Really there comes a point there is no keeping it from them.  Then what?

I am blessed with a young lady who reads like a book-worm, and has a solid comprehension of people, personalities, and her environment.  I am left only with the option to tell her the truth.

Sometimes the truth gets stuck in your throat, burns a bit, or leaves some nasty reflux.  Yet, still that bitter pill is the only one we’ve got.

I sometimes wonder how different things could have been, if…

But it is my girl who stops me.  Without this diagnosis she knows I would not be here.  My breast cancer was uncovered by her diagnosis and that diagnosis undoubtedly saved my life.  Without Cowden’s Syndrome she knows she would have become someone different.  Someone else.  And that wouldn’t have been right.

While I don’t believe in a God who wants us to suffer, I believe in one who uses that suffering to allow us to become a better version of ourselves.

My girl started Junior High with a broken foot.  During her 3 years there she endured less than perfect social relationships (read, a few very mean children and my child who didn’t always have the patience to contend with teenage normalcy) and 7 surgeries.  SEVEN. Seven recoveries, and pre and post operative visits too.  She did that while holding an average of well over 95% every single marking period.  She did that while making enormous strides as a competitive swimmer.  She did that while learning that she had a the voice of a singer hiding inside.  She did that while performing in several productions, practicing after school for months each year.  She did that while spearheading 3 successful PTEN Fundraisers, essentially putting Cowden’s Syndrome in the vocabulary of our community.  She’s ending Junior High on crutches.  Unfortunate bookends, or a reminder of the strength and resilience of a young lady who refuses to be defined by her disease.

I am sometimes not even sure if she is aware of her accomplishments, as she is so busy pushing onward to stop and notice.

Who sets the example here?

I guess I need to stop hiding from my computer.  Perspective never really leaves.  Sometimes it just needs to be worked through.

This diagnosis stinks.  This syndrome is a real bear to contend with.  It is lonely and isolating and leaves little time to even see family, let alone friends. However, as the saying goes –

And that is probably the real perspective.

And almost as if perfectly timed, I found my title for this blog – as the Pandora radio plays..

“They are inside your head
You got a voice that says
You won’t get past this one
You won’t win your freedom

It’s like a constant war
And you want to settle that score
But you’re bruised and beaten
And you feel defeated

This goes out to the heaviest heart

Oh, to everyone who’s hit their limit
It’s not over yet
It’s not over yet
And even when you think you’re finished
It’s not over yet
It’s not over yet
Keep on fighting
Out of the dark
Into the light
It’s not over
Hope is rising
Never give in
Never give up
It’s not over…”

(It’s Not Over Yet – For King and Country)

#beatingcowdens