It’s Complicated…

I was in the stairwell close to the 5th floor of the nursing home where my grandmother resides when the phone rang.  I paused, startled by the ring, and trying to suppress my slightly out of shape panting before I … Continue reading

Rare Disease Day- Video Recap

World Rare Disease Day is February 28th.  People all over the world will work to raise funds and awareness for over 7,000 Rare Diseases worldwide.  In our house things are buzzing, as we prepare to teach the world a bit more about Cowden’s Syndrome.rdd-logo-2

There will be so much time to write.  Soon.  Right now we are preparing for Rare Disease Day 2017 and “Jeans for Rare Genes 3.”  All the preparing brought me back to her video from last year.  And then I looked at the year before, and the one before that.  And I was struck by how much she has grown, not only in her technological ability, but also as an advocate, and a voice, and a human.

There will be no video this year.  It was time for a change of pace.  But, I thought it appropriate to post these here, now.  She keeps me grounded.  She keeps me going.

And then there was this…

http://blog.silive.com/gracelyns_chronicles/2017/02/inspirational_staten_islander.html

Together we remain

#beatingcowdens

Enjoy!

Inspirational Staten Islander 2016

An inspiration provokes a desire in you to be a better human.  An inspiration can be any age, race, gender or creed.  An inspiration speaks to your soul through their actions, and their behaviors.  Words are always secondary to actions.

A role model may be an inspiration, someone you want to emulate, whether they are family, friend, or famous.  Often we put the word “inspirational” to a sports figure, singer, or movie star, but all too often we are disappointed by those high up in positions of fame and fortune.

Inspirational people, the ones who change lives, tend to be regular people who we interface with often.  Coaches come quickly to mind as inspirational.  Teammates who are there to lift us up and share our shining moments and disappointments come to mind as well.  In some cases teachers can inspire us, by lighting a fire, or a love of learning, or a passion about a topic or a zest for knowledge.

inspiration1

I am fortunate to know many inspirational people.  Most of them would be confused if I named them.  They are typically the people out in the world doing their jobs, living their lives, and passionately giving their all to whatever task is theirs.

So many of you who read these words on a regular basis, inspire us to remain #beatingcowdens.

Last week I was notified that Meghan was nominated as “Inspirational Staten Islander of 2016.”  This nomination was connected to her selection as “Staten Islander of the Month”  in February 2016.  There was quite a list of remarkable, inspirational, every-day people on that list.  I read the article top to bottom and was truly, inspired.

Inspirational Islander Poll

inspiration4

But, Meghan is MY inspiration.  She is MY reason, my WHY.  I would not lie and ever say she or I are PERFECT, because no one is.  But we do pretty well together, supporting each other.  And, when I’m about done pushing, one look at her face inspires me to keep on keeping on.

There was a week of voting, by people who clearly felt a particular nominee was the most inspirational.  It was a week of watching the polls as family and friends voted alongside. By Monday she had a significant lead.  We were humbled.  By Tuesday afternoon as we sat in an MRI for her knee in Manhattan, she was behind.  Roller Coaster.  It was hard to react with the knowledge that each nominee indeed was inspirational. And,  winning or losing, would not increase or decrease the value of the other nominees inspirational acts.

Voting was to close at noon Wednesday.  I sat up Tuesday night to vote for MY inspiration, as often as I was allowed.  But, at some point I became very anxious, and I stopped and I prayed.  I asked for guidance as to when it was time to just walk away.  I asked for a clear sign.

At about 2:15 AM on Wednesday the 11th, I received a Facebook Message from Destinee Moe.  This young lady was running the poll right behind Meghan and I just wasn’t sure how it was going to end.  This is a text of the message.

Hello Mrs.Ortega I’m Destinee Moe one of the nominees for Inspirational Islander Of 2016. I just want you and your daughter to know how truly inspiring she is! I could never be as strong as Meghan 😊she going through a lot and still manages to smile! It’s truly an honor to be able to run against someone so strong 🙂 I wouldn’t want anyone else to win this race 💯 she truly inspires me to be a strong young adult ! Best of luck to both of you and hope everything is well with Meghan ❤️ keeping her in my prayers.

And I cried.  Right there in front of my computer screen.  There was the sign I had prayed for.  There was a soul so inspiring she was looking for the good in others she was racing against.  There was a meaningful inspiration.

inspiration3

I responded to her as best I could.

It’s funny I would catch your message at this hour, as years of parenting a sick little one, have left me able to function on not too much rest. I really appreciate your message, as everything I have read about you indicates you are of the same strength of character as my daughter. It is inspiring to me when young women like the two of you show leadership qualities at such a young age. This whole experience, win or lose, has been an incredible journey for her. Today she learned to balance her morning swim, with an honors schedule, and then a 2 hour MRI for the knee that caused her 6 surgeries and still gives her grief, followed by 2 more hours in traffic, significant homework, and keeping a close eye on the voting in between. This young lady I have is truly my inspiration, as her early diagnosis indeed saved my life. However, each story I read was inspirational and it renews my faith in people, and Staten Island. All the best to you as well. It will be behind us all in just a few hours. I have no doubt yours will be a name of influence to look for in the coming years. Stay true. All the best, Lori

She replied once more and I went to bed soon after.  When I woke the next day, Meghan held onto a lead into the noon cut-off.

By 12:45 there was a congratulatory message from Destinee:

Congratulations ❤️ I really hope this pushes her even more to be the strong Inspiring young lady she is. Have a bless day , Destinee

Meghan won the popular vote as “Inspirational Staten Islander of 2016,” and we all got a clearer sense that inspiration is all around us, sometimes coming out from the most unlikely places.

inspiration2

After all she endures on a regular basis, my Meghan’s one goal was to further awareness of Rare and Genetic Diseases, while getting the word out for her upcoming fundraiser.  Multi-tasking is necessary to follow her schedule.

2017 Event Flyer

2017 Event Flyer

Meghan remains humbled by the gravity of the congratulatory messages coming her way.  Just as she was touched deeply by the message from the nominee closest to her in the polls.

There are so many life lessons, so many inspirational people, so many teachable moments – if only we look.

Meghan attained the title of “Inspirational Staten Islander 2016” and she will use it as best she can to raise awareness of Cowden’s Syndrome, PTEN Mutations and other Rare Diseases.  She will also walk away with a few valuable life lessons.

We remain

#BeatingCowdens!

Click HERE to read the ARTICLE! (It’s a really good article! 😉 )

 

 

 

#Beatingcowdens on stage!

Tonight is a proud Mommy moment.  Tonight this girl, with no formal musical training, and about 4 brief singing lessons in her life – nailed this.

She spent some time in her other happy place – the stage.

Tonight she said to Cowden’s Syndrome – YOU ARE NOT THE BOSS OF ME!

All this, and she’s only in 8th grade.  Future is wide open.  Stay tuned.  ❤

Default to Kindness

spirit-swim

Meghan loves to swim.  I mean, athletically it wasn’t where she started, but the knees.  Six surgeries on the right knee, and there was to be no more soccer, and no more dance.  After the 6th one, there was to be even no more breaststroke.  There is no gym class in school.  There is limited walking.  There is one foot, a size bigger than the other.  The “off sides” that that creates in her body can be quite painful.  But, the pool…

Oh, how my girl loves the pool.  She is an athlete.  She is a competitor.  And the pool allows her to be both of those things to the best of her ability.

For the 3rd time in the 4th year since joining swimming, this September brought a new coach for her, and a new group of teammates.  There was anxiety about the switch on so many levels.  But, as we always say, life has a funny way of working out.

swim4

This coach is a perfect fit for her.  They practice hard, and often.  He is structured, and firm.  But he is compassionate, and constructive.  He watches.  There are sometimes 50 or more swimmers in the pool when he coaches, and I swear he does his best to make some comment to each of them every practice.  And, after they compete, his feedback always connects to practice.

And practice, for Meghan, has not been a problem.  While maintaining a “Pupil Path” account that no one could ever critique, and planning a major fundraiser, and looking for high schools, and managing doctors appointments, and a mom who doesn’t feel quite herself, this girl has, most weeks, attended practice, Monday, Thursday and Friday afternoon, as well as Tuesday, Friday, and Sunday morning.  Quite literally, swimming is good for her health.

Swimming can be a very solitary sport.  It takes a good deal of mental toughness to stare at a black line for hours.  Interactions with teammates on deck or during dryland (out of water training) are cherished.

swim6

Even then, as the “new kid” in the group, you can sometimes wonder about the relationships.  Meghan has been very careful not to share too much of her Cowden’s story with these swimmers.  She wants to be viewed as one of them, and she is doing a good job holding her own, all by herself.

And then there was today.  We were at a meet and she was scheduled to swim the 200 yard butterfly.  If you swim, no explanation is needed.  If you don’t let me give you a frame of reference.  For the group she swam with today, 72 girls swam the 100 yard freestyle.  10 signed up to swim the 200 yard butterfly.  It is not an event for the faint of heart.

Meghan feared disappointing, herself, her coach. me.  She was scared out of her mind.  So scared that it was out of character.  Out of character for a child that has had 17 surgeries, and countless tests. ER visits, and hospitalizations.  She was that scared.

And as the race approached I watched helplessly from the stands as she began to unravel.  And I watched with a grateful heart as teammates picked her up and put her back together again.

persistence3

The one who I can only say was acting as my angel, talked her right onto the block.  It only took a second of my attempt to video the race to see that something was terribly wrong.  There sat her goggles, first mid face, then in her mouth occluding her breathing.  In butterfly you can not break stroke.  At the end of the first 50 she stopped.  She was done.

My heart sank, and ached for her.  I wanted to pick her up and hug her, and take her back to the rocking chair I used to use when she was a baby.  But she’s 13 now – so I could only watch.

swim5

The official came to her and asked if she wanted to try again in the next heat.  There were 2 lanes open.  She said yes.  And as they placed her in one heat, her friend, my angel, came to the official and asked if Meghan could swim, “in the lane next to me.”  She said yes, and as Meghan barely got settled on the block, another teammate flagged the official to wait a moment.  Meghan’s goggles were still not on.

The start went fine this time.  The goggles stayed on.  And she did it.  The whole thing.

By the time she got to her last 2 laps, most of the other girls were finishing.  But, then there was more magic.  There was cheering, from her teammates and strangers alike.  There was a push for her to get finished, to press on, and to make it.  So, she did.

I think I cried the last two laps.  I was struck by this child of mine, her life, the adversity, and the stubbornness.  The ability to not give up.  The desire to be normal, and to succeed. And as she touched the wall her team mate, that same angel, swam right into her lane and gave her the biggest, most genuine hug.

She did it.

Not too shabby for the first time.  And more than one teammate whom she respects greatly told her they gave her credit for getting up and trying it again.  So did her coach.

Meghan isn’t the “cool” kid.  She sometimes struggles a little.  But, she remains true to herself at all times.

Today, she got to see the kindness in others.  It was pure.  It was genuine.  It was unsolicited.  It was the best kind.

13-18 year olds can be a tough group.  But these kids showed today that when they are left at their “default” setting, when they are alone and see soemone hurting, they will choose kindness and compassion.

She is asleep.  Tomorrow is another day of swimming.  But, those events won’t cause this angst.

Gratitude fills my heart, that once again even at the toughest moment, good shines through.

And as she said goodnight, she told me, “Next month, when I swim the 200 fly…”

swimming

Endurance.  Persistence.  Stamina.

#beatingcowdens

 

Overlap and Regrowth – Living with Cowden’s

So, the night I was recovering from my breast surgery on August 19th, I haphazardly checked my Email.

There sat an Email from Meghan’s endocrinologist that shook me out of my anesthesia recovery pretty quickly.  There is no time “in between” because there is usually SOMETHING going on.  Overlap is a way of life.

Meghan had had lab work drawn the 3rd of August.  Routine thyroid labs, and some tests from the gyn worked in.  On the 18th the EMail from the gyn told me she was suspicious of a few lingering “issues” and we would address them at her late fall appointment.

bloodwork

The endocrinologist’s EMail said he was concerned about the resurgence of her “thyroglobulin” levels.  He wanted to now treat her as a “high risk” thyroid cancer patient.

I almost dropped the phone, alone in my dark room.  The last paragraph said he’d be on vacation for two weeks, and we could talk when he returned.  I read.  And I reread.

thyroglobulin

Decoding step by step – “thyroglobulin” is created solely by thyroid tissue.  Someone with a complete thryoidectomy would have non-detectable levels about 3 or so months post operatively.  Only thyroid tissue generates thyroglobulin.  If some was left behind after her surgery a small number would have stabilized early.  But for it to be gone, and then show up…  This meant there had to be regrowth.  And yes, it happens.  Maybe to everyone, but definitely people with Cowden’s Syndrome.  We regrow lymphoid tissue.

superpower

It’s a superpower of sorts.  Except instead of being a really fun, save the world, or generate sunshine and happiness, superpower, it’s more of the – hey let’s add some more worry to your life superpower.

kid-super-power-881x588

While the pathology on the thyroidectomy was totally benign, the mind can play lots of tricks.  Lots of tricks.

I’m not slow.  I am pretty well read.  I’m equipped with the knowledge that having faith and worry are counterintuitive.  Except I’m honest.  And with matter of my girl, worry sometimes overwhelms.  I never claimed to be perfect.

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So I spent the last 6 or 7 weeks retreating.  I barely spoke of this fear, this nagging thought that not only could the thyroid be growing again, but what if… what if all those precancerous things that we took out with it were somehow festering.

I made it my job to access the lab work.  And it was a JOB.  You would have thought what I was asking for just to see a list of messed up thyroid numbers.  We live in a pretty crazy society.  But, finally, after 2 weeks of labor, and getting increasingly vocal, I received 4 copies.  All on different days.  All from different people.  But, I got to look at the numbers.

I am a numbers person, so I took some relief in the thyroglobulin being only 3.  Undetectable was better, but 3 was on the better end of things.  It was clearly well under that “10” I had found.  So I took to waiting and ticking away the days until the next blood test.  There was a thyroid dose change, and 6 weeks.

I broke my toe while recovering from the implant exchange, a few weeks after learning I was suffering not only from a single vocal cord lesion, but vocal atrophy secondary to premature aging, the latter which was likely due to the hysterectomy that became necessary after the breast cancer diagnosis in 2012.

And yes, I meant that to be a run-on.

It all kept me as occupied as I could while I hid in the start up chaos of September.  I hate September.  But, when you’re suffering personal angst and need cover under which to hide – it’s September for the win.  I poured myself into setting up 25 classes, and over 550 students, logistically, and academically.  It took some time.

And I kind of just ducked.  Phone calls, texts… I played along.

“High Risk” thyroid cancer patient… like a recurring nightmare.

One of the reasons I was afraid to talk was the fear that someone would talk to be about thryoid cancer being the “best” cancer.  Please, no one ever do that.  When it comes to my child, a survival rate in the 90%s doesn’t soothe me.  When it comes to my child, I, like every other parent want 100%.  Nothing less.

I was scared.

We got the labs drawn at the hospital on Weds. the 28th.

On the 30th I was exploding.  Every second seemed like an hour.  Every scenario was playing through my head.  So when I got the call that the test wouldn’t be ready till Monday I dissolved into a tiny puddle.

And then I did what every other mother does.  I put on my big girl pants and got through the weekend.

Then Monday there was a brief phone call.

The thyroglobulin has returned to undetectable.

WHAT?  How does that even happen?  I sent out a million questions rapid fire.  Most of them had no answer.

Crisis averted.  Prayers answered.

gratitude

I explained to Meghan why her Mom had been a bit extra on edge.  She’s really growing up because she was grateful to have not traveled that mental journey with me, and appreciated me letting her in when it mattered.

Next blood test November 11.  And we’re going with the theory that the thyroglobulin was a one time deal.  An error.  A miracle.  Whatever.  A win.

We’ve got 6 weeks.  Some Mommy doctors.  Some swim meets.  6 weeks.  Sometimes that feels short.  Right now it’s blissfully long.

On my knees in gratitude, we remain…

#beatingcowdens

thanks-beach

 

On Your 13th Birthday…

 

scan0003August 9, 2016

Dear Meghan,

As I sit to write this some time in the middle of the night, I am reminded of the early years, when so many of the middle of the night hours belonged to the two of us.  Yes, Meg, I said YEARS.

lori & meg

You struggled my girl, but your determination was evident early, like the day the NICU nurse called you feisty.  She was right.  And it has proven to be one of your finest and most valuable attributes.

When I look back on pictures of those early years, it doesn’t seem all that bad.  I guess I never had time or desire to photograph some of those tear-stained days.  And maybe. if it wasn’t for the colicky cry seared into my brain, I might have even come to forget that you considered sleep optional, crying and screaming mandatory, and that carrier pouch a requirement for all things.  At one point we had even taken to calling you a kangaroo baby…

You and your tired Mommy!

                               You and your tired Mommy!

But, I look at the babies in those pouches,  And I think to those mother’s “enjoy it.”  You might find this hard to believe my dear, but there is not a single minute I would change or do over.  Every step along this journey with you has BEEN the journey.  And I have the deepest gratitude that God selected me to be your mother.

photo 23

The path hasn’t been easy.  Sometimes it’s been rocky, and a little unsettled.  Other times its been like traveling through fire. On a bicycle.  With no handlebars.  Backwards. But, I think we’ve all found pieces of ourselves we never knew existed, and there is a family bond between you, and me and Daddy that so many envy.  Not for what we’ve done or where we’ve been, but rather the fact that we have done, and continue to do it all together.

At eight years old, you were tossed a diagnosis of a Rare Disorder, a 1 in 200,000 PTEN Mutation called Cowden’s Syndrome, that has leveled many grown adults.  But, by eight years old, you were already seasoned at doctors, OT, PT, and speech.  You’d been there, and were still doing dome of that.  At 8 you were intimately aware of what it meant to spend hours waiting for doctors, and you had a clearer visual of an operating room than anyone should ever have.  So really, in reality, that diagnosis just pushed us in the right direction to continue to help you become who you were meant to be.

It’s rotten to be the “unusual one”  the one with all the risks and the need for that “hyper-vigilant” surveillance.  But, I’m thankful.

See without Dr. Jill to push us to your diagnosis, without all those things falling into place, it’s likely I wouldn’t be here to write this. Your diagnosis led to mine,  and while I am intimately connected with the reality there is no guarantee of tomorrow on this earth for any of us, my heart is sure that you, my angel, my gift, you my dear saved my life.

I watch you with each passing year, and the challenges pile on top of themselves.   And we both sometimes want to stop the presses and scream, “IT’S NOT FAIR” and the top of our lungs.  but then we laugh.  “Fair” is just a silly word anyway.   It’s not the perspective we use.  It’s not worth our time.

You approach this birthday with 17 operating room trips under your belt, and too may ER visits and, tests, and hospitalizations to count. You have had to make decisions, and think thoughts that are beyond the scope of what you should contend with.  But with grace and dignity you proceed, because none of that is what defines who you are.

Grace,. Poise. Strength under pressure.

               Grace. Poise. Strength under pressure.

 

Despite unimaginable pain, you press on.  Your body would not allow for dancing school or soccer.  But the competitor in you was not to be silenced.  Running was out of the question, so now you “fly,” in the water, 11 months a year 4-5 days a week for hours.  You pull energy out of the crevices of your toes to push through when most would curl up and give up.

First season swimming, a few weeks in. Spring 2013

             First season swimming, a few weeks in. Spring 2013

2016 Working on her "fly"

                              2016 Working on your “fly”

You press on in the community, focused to raise the necessary founds the PTEN foundation will need to create our patient database.  But, you will not turn your back on the charity where you began, Global Genes, “for the babies who can’t speak for themselves,” you tell me.  You make flyers, select venues, advertise and collect raffles.   You speak at schools and organizations across the Island who will have you, to raise awareness that rare diseases are everywhere.  For the last 2 Februaries we have celebrated Rare Disease Day with almost 200 people, gathered because you have a mission.

Youngest “Woman of Distinction” recognized in Albany by Senator Lanza in May.  Proudest parents.

_DSC6895

I watch you talk to people and I swell with pride.  When you’re intermittently stuck in that wheelchair you hate, you decided to help the doubters, the starers and those passing judgment.  A simple business card with a phrase you helped create “Cowden’s Syndrome – Rare. Invisible. Real.”  It starts a conversation, or it ends the behavior.  Either way you manage with grace to rise above.

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You take the high road so many times a day.  I know it’s not easy.  And I know there are people in your path every minute determined not to make it easy.  But, truth be told, as we are learning, there are others out there.  There are real people, at swimming, at youth group, at SICTA.  There are real people who are finally recognizing that you are pretty spectacular. And I don’t mean that in a ‘who is better than who’ way.  I mean it in it’s best sense.  Everyone is spectacular in some way.  You just learned it a little early.

As you turn 13 this week, I wish you so many things, from the depths of my heart and soul;

*Never lose the magic.  Ever.

ALWAYS remember THAT feeling.

                                        ALWAYS remember THAT feeling.

*Never compromise yourself for anyone.  Remember that doesn’t mean to be brick wall stubborn.  It means to keep those morals.  Rise above.

*Always remember no matter how wild and crazy the world gets, you’ve got two parents who will love you regardless… and that is a PROMISE.

*Smile, sing, laugh, act, dance, be sarcastic, and sensitive, and guarded and silly, with a healthy touch of humor thrown in.  Do it all always with respect.

*Continue to constantly take every obstacle tossed at you, and it toss it back, or walk past it and move on. When they tell you you can’t, find a way to show them you can.

*Never let anyone make you feel less than.  You, you are enough.  You are always enough.  God said so, and He is smarter.  Trust.

*”Be the change you wish to see in the word.” – Ghandi

hope_balloons_small2

Your teenage years will be a giant path of self-discovery.  It won’t always be smooth.  But nothing is.

Be you, and it will fall into place.  And in the off chance that none of that works, I’m not going anywhere.

I love you from the bottom of my heart.  You truly are the child I was meant to have, and there is NO ONE I’d rather be #beatingcowdens with, than YOU!

Happy 13th Birthday!  You will always remain, “My Most Thankful Thing!”

I love you ALWAYS,

Mom

Thanks for bringing out the best in me. I love you more than you know.

        Thanks for bringing out the best in me. I love you more than you know.

Pathology…

About an hour ago I got off the phone with Meghan’s gynecologist.  It seems we dodged another bullet.

Mostly.

Once again we got to spend about 45 seconds in a deep breath as we were told there was no evidence of malignancy in the uterine biopsy from last Friday.

BUT…

There is always a “BUT…”  I’ve come to expect it now.  After she spoke, she paused.

I asked her why she sounded happy and hesitant at the same time.

“Well I just got off the phone with the pathologist…”  and her voice trailed off.

So much was what she expected when she spoke to us Friday.  But, it was still bothering her that there are polyps.  And more than one.

“It just shouldn’t be…”

Sigh.

We’ve heard this so many times before.  “It just shouldn’t be…”  But, in fact it is.

So the polyps were benign.  The tissue sampling was benign.  This is a good thing.  A very good thing.

Digitally generated My brain has too many tabs open

But, this whole situation.  The whole scenario that causes all sorts of conversations a 12 or 13, or even a 19 or 20 year old for that matter, should NEVER have to have, is just not ok.

There are thoughts, decisions, trade-offs, conversations, risks and benefits that make deciding on a high school seem trivial.  Strange that THAT will be the toughest thing most girls her age have to do this year.

Soul_Darkness_Light_Stars_Night

And as I look at her, it kills me inside the things she has to go through, and the thoughts she needs to think.  All I can do is thank GOD, that He trusted me with this beautiful, dynamic, witty, young lady.  And I promise to take good care of her until the rest of the world figures her out.

 (and really, for FOREVER. as we remain #BEATINGCOWDENS together!)

“We’re All in this Together…”

High School Musical – We’re All In This Together

“…Everyone is special in their own way
We make each other strong
We’re not the same
We’re different in a good way
Together’s where we belong
We’re all in this together
Once we know
That we are
We’re all-stars
And we see that
We’re all in this together
And it shows
When we stand
Hand in hand
Make our dreams come true…”
The news is filled with horror stories.  Local and abroad, young and old.  Lives lost through senseless acts.  Cries for unity, and division sometimes drown each other out.  From the grand scale, to stories closer to home, we seem collectively to be lacking the notion that, for lack of a better phrase, “We’re all in this together…”
As Rare Disease patients, one of the statistics that blew Meghan and I away early in the game, was the one that said 1 in 10 Americans suffers from a Rare Disease.  If all of these people got together, they would make the world’s THIRD most populated country.
  • 30 million people in the United States are living with rare diseases. This equates to 1 in 10 Americans or 10% of the U.S. population.
  • If all of the people with rare diseases lived in one country,  it would be the world’s 3rd most populous country.
  • Source https://globalgenes.org/rare-diseases-facts-statistics/

We have wondered through the years what good could come of uniting forces for the benefit of all Rare Disease Patients.  And slowly we are starting to see charities connect for the betterment of the big picture.  The PTEN foundation has teamed with a patient with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, to raise funds to benefit both causes, and for those that remain undiagnosed.

Please consider supporting this cause.  There is important work being done for all.

(FROM THE PTEN FOUNDATION FACEBOOK PAGE) Exciting News!!! We have a team of 12 sponsored cyclists that will support Ride4Gabe getting the word out about ‪#‎Duchenne‬ Muscular Dystrophy,‪#‎PTEN‬, and all Rare Genetic Illnesses with unmet medical needs. This is huge. You can help, please share this and our team go fund me link often. 1/2 of all proceeds will go to our PTEN Foundation. 

HTTPS://www.gofundme.com/wesupportride4gabe

THEY GET IT!  They understand, “We’re all in this together…”

I was never a huge fan on Disney’s High School Musical.  I’m not really sure I ever sat down to watch, and I likely judged without thinking.  But I’ll be the first to tell you first impressions can be flawed.  And I’ll also tell you that I ‘get it’ on a much more grand scale after last night.

For us it started with a friendship that bloomed between Meghan and one of the most compassionate young ladies I have ever met.  They’ve known each other forever, but only in recent times have they come to know each other as “friend.”  They spent time on stage together through middle school productions, and it was through this young lady we learned of a Summer Theater opportunity offered.

Meghan's "Sisters" not by birth, but through love, heart and choice.

Meghan’s “Sisters” not by birth, but through love, heart and choice.

Welcome to the

Staten Island Children’s Theatre Association

We are a self-sustaining program sponsored by the Staten Island Mental Health Society whose mission is to promote positive mental health through the arts.  We are currently celebrating our 52nd Season of bringing live theater to children and families. 

Looking for a summer change of pace, and not knowing at all what to expect, I dropped Meghan off to the Snug Harbor dance theater where these forty-five or so 9-18 year olds would spend the next 8 days generating a full “junior” production.  I walked into the back of the room for the parent meeting at the end of the first day, and I watched the children, and young adults, attentive on the floor.  This was July.  There were a lot of them.  Their respect had already been earned by the staff.  This was a “no-nonsense” set up.  We received out parent information and as we left to head home, my girl said very little about the day.  She told me she liked it though, and this was a big win.

Some of the children in the program were new, like she was.  Others had been in the program for years.  And somehow it seemed to not matter.  Ages, genders, styles, personal interests, there seemed to be very few alienating factors.  Everything seemed to be joining them together.

Each day pick up was a little smoother.  Names were a little more familiar.  Identities seemed a bit more well-established.  By the time we came home last Friday, it was hard to imagine they had only spent a bit more than 24 hours together.

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10-4 for eight days they sang, they learned, they laughed and they grew.  They focused and learned that they needed to keep …

 “Just keep ya head in the game
Just keep ya head in the game

And don’t be afraid
To shoot the outside “J”
Just keep ya head in the game…”

They became a team.  They became a group of high energy youth, who each possess their own strengths.  Instead of trying to outshine each other, they learned they would shine best together.

Last night before we got into the theater I looked around.  I saw photos from the dress rehearsal, parents and children I knew from other walks of life, and family and friends there to support my girl.  I am an over-thinker.  I always will be.  It was hard not to think one week from then she’d be, God-willing, on my couch recovering from another biopsy.  But, that was not about tonight.  Tonight was about #beatingcowdens by being part of a group, by being one of “them,” and by being on that stage in a very present way.  So I cleared my head, and I watched.

Sneaking in a Proud Mommy Moment 🙂

I watched a play about finding your own identity, supporting each other, not being linked into your “label,” following your passions, learning trust, and forgiveness and so much more.

I never was a fan of “High School Musical,” until last night.  Last night I realized that there was such a timely, deeper meaning.

Truly, “We’re all in this together…”  and in the words of Ben Franklin, “We must all hang together, or most assuredly we will all hang separately…” It’s time.

HSMo

It’s time we stop seeing labels, and who we think people are.  It’s time we start learning who they really are.  It’s time to start celebrating the good.  Because there is much good to be celebrated.

On an island knee-deep in a very real drug crisis, hitting every single walk of life, I am filled with gratitude for SICTA, for giving children something to focus on, and for instilling a positive message of self-worth and deeper meaning.  I can not name all the adults who touched my girl’s life this week for fear of leaving someone out, but YOU, YOU are leading by example.  I  am full of gratitude.

Life #beatingcowdens is riddled with twists and turns.  You gave us a brief respite.

And, as the lovely young lady took Meghan from the steps of the theater and invited her to the diner “with the cast,” so many things came together.

“We’re All in This Together,”  indeed.  THANK YOU #SICTA

“1,2,3…BRAVA!”