“… Turn on the Light!” -Albus Dumbledore (J.K. Rowling)

Last week my daughter pulled on a shirt before we headed out to the doctor for the umpteenth time this summer.  I didn’t think much of it at first.  I was grateful she was dressed and pulled together, and ready without event.  As a matter of fact, I was in full on grown up mode, rushing her almost 5’8″ frame and her crutches along to get us prepared for the obligatory ridiculous traffic as we traveled what seems to be the longest 30 miles ever.

I don’t think I even read the shirt until we were in the waiting room a few hours later.

I had read the Harry Potter series as each book came out – beginning as a 5th grade teacher more than 20 years ago.  My daughter enjoyed the series in its entirety in a brief period during her year in second grade.  I enjoyed the books, each one, but it took a reread or two to analyze things on a deeper level for me.  Dumbledore, the wise guide had an infinite amount of wisdom to offer.

Whether she realized it or not, my girl was sending a message that morning – to both of us.  There is an ongoing battle, here, and I suspect in many lives, to live the days as they come.  We try to “get out of our own way” and “our own head” as the case may be.  And it is not easy.  When we look further ahead than the day, sometimes even the hour, or moment, it is easy to get swallowed up.  The darkness comes hard and fast.  Too many appointments, too much worry, too many “what ifs,”  too much time wasted, too many plans unfulfilled.  No one likes the dark.

So don’t stay there.  Turn on the light.

Thank you J.K. Rowling, for giving us Albus Dumbledore.

That appointment Tuesday, it wasn’t great.  There are still no real answers.  There is swelling on the knee.  There is pain.  There was confusion from the surgeon.  He decided we had rested the knee.  Now, it was time to add two medications to treat the knee, a neoprene sleeve for swim, and PT back in the equation.  For 2 weeks we will move it and see if that helps.  Nothing more than educated guesswork.

I hate it when we have to guess.  But, I am grateful for a surgeon willing to logically troubleshoot.  We visit him again in 2 weeks.  He is confused, but he is smart.  And he will not quit.

So with a surgeon who made the choice to keep working on it – my girl did the same.  Every day we have choices to make… all day… every day.  Those choices shape and mold us.

My daughter was to be part of a beloved theater group these first two weeks of July.  Some of the most compassionate, talented and caring young people are in that group, guided by adults that are not afraid to give everything they have for the betterment of the children in their charge.  Last year, she had arguably one of the best experiences of her life, and when the word came that she could not participate, that the knee was not prepared for that amount of standing – she was crushed.  But, being who they are, the staff, and the students alike not only allowed her, but welcomed her to be with them during rehearsals.  As we watched two amazing performances of “Aladdin Jr.” on Friday night, I know she wished to be on the stage, but the pure joy of excitement for the success of these children – her peers- was evident.

She could have sat home and sulked.  They could have said she could not come.  Instead, the best possible outcome came from unfortunate circumstances.  Another major life lesson.  Executed flawlessly.

My daughter has dreams.  Big dreams.  She aspires to be a better human, and to assist those who struggle.  She wants to learn her voice, and sing to the best of her ability.  She desires to perform, on stage, often.  She seeks venues for community outreach and has goals to raise awareness and funds to cure PTEN Mutations like our Cowden’s Syndrome, and other rare diseases.  She strives to be an athlete.  The same thrill of competition that creates great anxiety, lights a fire deep in her soul.  She also has hopes, standards, and expectations for herself.  She actually, most days, can do a lot of the parenting work without me.  But, sometimes when those dreams and goals are forced to pause, and rest for whatever issue is going after the body at that time, its nice to remember the words of Dumbledore, “It does not do to dwell on dreams and forget to live.  Remember that.”


Exact, precise language.  That is how my girl likes it.  We sometimes kid that she will be an attorney.  At the very least, an advocate for herself, and maybe others.  There is little gray area with Meghan.  She likes people who are kind.  She does not like people who are not.  End of story.

Or is it?  In this age of adolescence there are times when lines are clear, and times when they are blurry.  Emotions run high.  There are times when things are said, and done that are deliberate, and mean and awful, and other times where things FEEL deliberate and mean and awful where that was not the intention.

That changes things for the speaker, but rarely for the recipient.  With intent being often left to the interpretation of the recipient,  words can cut more sharply than a sword, and pierce the soul and the spirit.  Words hold great power.

The absence of words, those kind sentiments, thought, but never spoken, can injure as well.

My girl is far from perfect.  I myself am far from perfect.  We have many conversations between ourselves about the power of words.  Sometimes we hurt each other’s feelings.  Usually we talk it through.  Our relationship invariably gets stronger.

That’s because we speak.  And we hear.  So many times when words have hurt, a conversation could clarify so much.  An honest reflection that not a single one of us is perfect in our speech or actions is invaluable for growth.  Friendships grow, not over text messages through an iPhone screen, or photo exchanges… friendships grow when we take the time to talk, and laugh, and listen and hear and care.

And, perhaps many times, when you are lonely or simply alone, those are the times words, or their absence, can hold the greatest power.

Nature vs. Nurture.

An especially complex conversation in light of genetic discoveries happening every day.

In this house my daughter, although she first learned of it as she turned 8, was born with Cowden’s Syndrome- a PTEN Mutation leading to a high incidence of benign and malignant tumor growth.  She was born with this condition, because I was born with this condition.  That statistics and numbers are real.  They are hard core.  They are disturbing.

A 2012 article about PTEN related cancer risks.

However, because we are BORN with this Syndrome, it does not mean we will develop every possible manifestation.  We have AVMs and thyroid issues, and lipomas, but of yet, no colon issues at all.  I had breast cancer, early stage.  So did my mom who is not a PTEN patient.  We have large head size, but not autism.  You get the idea.

I believe we are born with certain things.  I believe that Meghan and I were born with Cowden’s Syndrome, and I even have theories about its origin.

I also believe that EVERYONE has something.  We are either born with it, or it develops.  Whether it is a physical ailment, or an unfortunate circumstance, there are forces affecting each of us.

Life is not smooth.  But within life there are choices.  Every day there are choices.

Choose kindness.

Choose compassion.

Choose love.

Choose forgiveness.

Choose happiness.

Choose to find your “Never Give UP.”

Choose to trust.

Choose to take risks.

Choose to care.

Choose to push yourself.

Choose to believe you can.

Knowing, that sometimes those choices will hurt.  Sometimes they will leave you angry or even furious.

Know in your heart that those are the only choices.

As you “grow to be…” it is those choices that will help you navigate the path to be the very best version of yourself.

Some people go their whole lives and never meet their hero.  I gave birth to mine, and her stamina and drive continue to inspire me daily.

#beatingcowdens

It’s Complicated…

I was in the stairwell close to the 5th floor of the nursing home where my grandmother resides when the phone rang.  I paused, startled by the ring, and trying to suppress my slightly out of shape panting before I acknowledged the call clearly coming from the medical office we had visited earlier that day.

It was Tuesday the 11th.  “Spring Break” had begun Saturday the 8th.  Early that Saturday morning I had left on a road trip alone to the Marine Corps Base in Quantico where I had the privilege of watching a Marine who served with my Dad receive the Bronze Star with Valor – almost 50 years after the day it was earned.  It was a whirlwind trip – 5 hours down that morning, and a busy, fun, emotional day that lasted well past midnight.  I returned to Staten Island by 12:30 PM Sunday, in time to catch Meghan’s 1 PM Swim meet.  Felix took “off” the workweek and spent Monday and Tuesday overseeing the installation of air conditioning in our house.  It was 24 hours well spent – 12 each day- but the inevitable trail of dust and dirt needed to be tended to as well.  So, I had headed to this appointment alone with Meghan earlier in the day.  Now I was trying to visit with Grandma, although she’s often unsure I was ever there… I still know.

I took a deep breath before I answered.

A lovely young woman, whose cheery voice caused me to immediately forget her name asked, “Is this Meghan’s mother?”  That is my favorite title- depending on whose asking.  I tried my best to muster and equally cheery, “Yes, it is.”

“Oh, good.  I was asked to set up Meghan’s surgical date.”

Sigh,  Even though I knew the call was coming – it doesn’t get easier.  I also knew I had very specific directions from Meghan that I was to “get it done as fast as possible.”

“How soon can we do this?”  I asked.

“My first available is May 11th.”

“REALLY?  A whole month?”  I thought of the anticipation and the anxiety that would build as the pain increased.  Then I realized something worse.  May 11th is opening night for “Bye Bye Birdie,” her school play.  Cast as Rosie she’s been preparing forever.  There was just no way.  I swallowed hard.

“What if I can’t take that date?”  I held my breath,

Cheery changed her tune.  I’m sure she thought I was being difficult.  I tried to explain.  No luck.

“The next date is May 20th, then you’re into June.”

I was playing out the June calendar in my brain.  ComicCon with Dad, school dance, graduation, West Virginia… forget about the Long Course Swim Season and the 2 meets we knew she’d have to scratch out of, and the last CYO Swim meet she’d ever be eligible for- that was out too.

There was never going to be a good time to be out of commission.

Deep breath.  “Any chance you’ll have cancellations?”

“No.”

“Ok then.  May 20th it is.”

And after telling me I’d need to give up a day the week before for formal pre-surgical testing, which is a first for us, as she grows up, I didn’t bother to explain I’d just missed 16 days of work for vocal cord surgery.  I just said, “Thank you.”

Meghan’s relationship with her right knee is complicated.  It started giving her trouble before she could talk, as her first babysitter will attest to hours rubbing that knee.  As she grew, it got worse.  It always seemed to bother her.  She pushed, and pushed.  Eventually it was hot to the touch and pulsating.  The diagnosis came in 2008, after multiple mis-diagnoses, including “her pants are too tight.”  Finally, a team at Sloan Kettering, adept at ruling out cancer, was able to diagnose a high flow arteriovenous malformation (AVM) in that knee.  We were sent off to Interventional Radiology at Lenox Hill, where the doctor confidently told us he could eliminate this AVM in “one procedure – 2 tops.”  Between December of 2009 and February of 2012 there were 4 embolizations on that knee.

The doctor seemed almost relieved when she was diagnosed with Cowden’s Syndrome in the fall of 2011.  It seemed as if he felt better about himself, like there was another explanation to justify why the darn thing just wouldn’t quit.  By that point she was being run through the surgical mill, so we welcomed the 2 and a half years of monitoring.  It seemed to stabilize.

But, as everything overlaps and one thing leads to another, there was pain.  There was pain that she was repeatedly told should not be there.  Yet, no matter what they said, the pain was there, and it was consistent, and it was real.  She pressed through.  She stopped soccer and tried dance.  The knee was cut out for neither.  She found her way into the pool in the spring of 2013.

By that fall we had signed her up for a 12 month competitive swim team, and things were looking up.  She swam a full year, getting stronger, becoming more confident, and finally feeling like an athlete.

There were other surgeries in between.  And there was that knee pain.She had been prescribed Celebrex to substitute for the Advil that was being consumed in clearly excessive quantity to allow her to function.  And the Celebrex was wonderful.  Until it wasn’t.

And in May of 2014, two months after a complete thyroidectomy (thank you Cowden’s) she lay in the hospital in severe GI distress.  It took a week to stabilize her.  I was scared.  Out went the Celebrex, fried food, and a whole host of other goodies.

But, little did I realize, that Celebrex was likely the reason the AVM had quieted down.  Apparently the drug has properties that work on blood flow.  A few months off of the Celebrex and all hell broke loose.  Literally.  It was November of 2014, the Tuesday night before Thanksgiving when she collapsed outside of swim practice, unable to walk.  Our travels that night took us directly to Lenox Hill ER because we were sure it was the AVM in action again.

Proven right when the surgeon showed up early the next morning giving me a surgical time for her, they drained 50ccs of blood from the knee that day.

Blood and bone and tissue are not friendly.  It’s like neighbors invading space.  You can tolerate it for a while, but it doesn’t take long before the damage is irreparable.  It became evident there was structural damage beginning because the blood had begun to wear things away and allow the knee cap to move to places it did not belong.

We were advised to consult with an orthopedist, and we did.  He wanted a coordinated arthroscopy where both he and the interventional radiologist would be in the OR together.  It became an orthopedic procedure.  The patella was moved back where it belonged.  Things were cleaned out.  Recovery was smooth relative to the emobolizations.  We were told it would last a few years.

In January 2017 we were pretty much released from interventional radiology.  We were told the AVM seemed quiet and we need only bring her back if she becomes symptomatic again.  In February the knee pain started again.  Slow, but steady, it kept growing in duration and consistency.  At a routine visit the orthopedist mentioned the potential need for another arthroscopy.  He reviewed the January MRI and showed us where the patella had shifted again.  He said her growth plates were “wide open” (a scary thought at over 5’7″) and that this would continue to be an issue at least until she finishes growing.  He offered her a “patella stabilizing brace” for 6 weeks, to see if it would do the job he wanted done.

Tuesday the 11th he looked at her knee for less than 2 minutes before he started making plans for the surgery.  He explained to us what he needed to cut and move, and why it was time to get it done.  We had the necessary conversations about length of time out of the pool, and other restrictions.  We left, quiet and resolved.  The only thing she asked me was to just get it done as soon as possible.

So when the phone rang in the hall last Tuesday afternoon, I felt sucker-punched, again.  Regardless of how many times I tell myself, and her, that it “could be worse” and we have to “look at the bright side,” the reality is that sometimes it sucks.  And that’s just the frank honest truth.  Scheduling your 7th knee surgery in 13.5 years is just not ok, not even a bit.  I was grateful for Grandma, and the ability to be distracted for a bit.  Without her memory, she is just real.  That was a good day.  And that day she loved having me.  I cherished the visit.

I spent Wednesday in the grocery shopping marathon, and Wednesday night at swim.

Thursday was for an extensive blood draw for Meghan and a triple dermatologist appointment.  Meghan headed to play practice, and I traveled to my vocal follow up in NYC.

My report was adequate, but not what I had hoped for.  Still swelling.  Still be very careful.  Still rest when you can.  Still exercise caution when you get back into your program on the 19th.

Friday was for vocal therapy.  And for trying to put the house back together.  And for painting upstairs, and washing the dist off the curtains, and visiting my in-laws.  It was our 17th Anniversary.  We sneaked an hour or two for dinner together…

Saturday was voice lessons, and…

Somehow it bled into Sunday, and Easter and some time with family.  But, it was immediately back to the painting.

By Monday I was waiting for the blood results, hoping to catch a call from one of the three doctors on the order.  We hit the orthodontist to have the retainer tightened, and a few things at Costco before it was time for swim…

I am focusing on the sunny days.  I am trying to find some time within the chaos to be still.

I asked Meghan why she was so uptight the other day.  It really was a stupid question.  This was the grossly abbreviated version of ONE aspect of her real life.

And tomorrow she will have to practice smiling and responding to the question “How was your break?”  in the only socially acceptable way.  “It was fine, how about you?”

Fine… it has so many meanings.  We don’t want to bring people down all the time.  It gets hard to have a conversation sometimes though.  Felix and I realized in the years since we’re married, one of us has been in an operating room somewhere in the neighborhood of 34 times.  A lot of our days are spent recovering.  Physically, mentally and emotionally recovering.  Fighting financially against incorrect billing, and generally trying to breathe.

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, we would not trade our lives for anyone’s.  However, just like in anyone’s life, some days are better than others.

I’m anxious for a vacation not peppered with appointments and surgeries.

Until then, maybe I should teach Meghan to answer “How was your vacation?” with “It’s complicated…”

#beatingcowdens

Deep Cleanse

I had a list of things to accomplish while I recover from my vocal cord surgery on 3/3.  I have been unable to work, preserving my voice for exercises given by my therapist, and brief conversation.  But, aside from the inconvenience of not speaking, I have felt pretty well.

That left me with a little time to get a few things done.

I could not push it physically, but I sorted papers, shredded, sent Emails that were overdue, and generally handled things that had fallen by the wayside during the busy nature of life.

I discovered, much to my disappointment, that my attention span for reading has decreased exponentially since spending so much time at a computer screen these last few years.  I vowed to get to work on that.

I also discovered that I have an account on the family’s “Netflix”  and I learned how to sit still long enough to binge watch some “Law and Order.”

There was time over these three weeks for some honest self-reflection as well.

Sometimes it’s painful to put truth right in front of our own faces, but I had the time to do the work, so I went for it.  I already wrote about isolation,  and I had some time to think more deeply about what role my own actions play in that.  I was able to reconcile that some of it is unavoidable, and some can be mended by me.  Balance.  I’m on it.

I also took a hard look at my own emotions and how they affect my house.

It is so easy to get “stuck” in the role of caregiver.  It is so easy to live a task oriented existence, making sure things get done, and arranging the logistics of life.  We may only have one child, but you add into the equation, two of us with a genetic disorder that involves countless appointments, surgeries, therapy and follow-ups things get dicey quickly. Add in that every appointment in NYC is a MINIMUM of 4 hours, and sometimes 6 or more, and the billing that comes with these appointments is at least a part-time job on its own, well, your head can spin.  Then, you think about the issues that surround friends and family, illness, disease, financial hardship, emotional distress, and your heart can hurt.  When you join that with “regular” stuff, like 2 working parents, a scholar, athlete, theater buff kid, food sensitivities, prescription medication, and anxiety all around – well, it can easily become all-consuming.  And it did.

I sat in my office one day, looked around and realized I was unhappy.  That was a tough realization.

I am not unhappy with my husband, or my daughter, or the countless blessings in our life.  I just became so consumed with getting things done that I forgot myself.  Literally.

Sometimes its good to reflect.  It’s the only way to get things done.

Last week my sister sent me a box of essential oils.  I was skeptical.  I bought a diffuser.  I feel like peppermint in the air while I work is good for my soul.  So is trying something new.

Tuesday I went to Kohl’s. A quiet activity easily done alone.  I felt the tension start to release.  I picked up a few things for me and for the house.  I went out because I WANTED to.

Something amazing happened Tuesday.  My husband and my daughter both remarked that I looked happy.  I had a story to relay at dinner that was about me.  The mood in the house was lighter.

Wednesday I took a nap in the middle of the day.  Because I could.  Again, I found myself with a little less pressure in my shoulders.

That night I promised myself and my family, no matter how busy things got I would find a way to spend 15-30 minutes every day on SOMETHING I could say truly made ME happy.

I’m a work in progress.

I chose to do a deep cleanse on Thursday and Friday.  I was working on my mind, but I had to bring my body along.  It had been too long.  I had gotten a little lazy in my habits and in my routines.  I have this incredible nutritional system at my fingertips and in my home, and sometimes I forget to use it to its full potential.

I woke up this morning having released 5.1 pounds of junk.  I started the day with a protein shake full of strawberries.  I shopped with my girl this morning.  Then, I got to listen to her singing lesson.  Now, they watch a movie while I get to write.  Then, my little family is off to dinner together.

This week the spring plants that sprouted on 3/3 started to really grow.

The caterpillars that came in on 3/2 have all become butterflies today.

Maybe we all used the same period to try to transform a little.  Nothing like a few new butterflies to remind you about new beginnings.

I am focused on this journey now.  I may falter along the way, but I will hold true.  This feels right.  This feels good.  And when I feel right and good, it is much easier to remain

#beatingcowdens

Richmond County Savings Foundation

If you were with us at “Jeans for Rare Genes” you heard me announce we had received a grant for $2500 from the Richmond County Savings Foundation.

This story Inspirational Staten Islander to host Fund Raiser ran on February 4th.  On February 8th I was contacted by the Richmond County Savings Foundation.  The story had been read, and it was suggested we apply for a grant on behalf of the PTEN Foundation.

We are relatively new to the fundraising thing, but with a lot of help, we got on track and completed the application.  The PTEN Foundation President, Kristen, spoke with them to get the 501c3 papers squared away.   And – about 10 days later we were notified of a $2500 grant, awarded to the PTEN Foundation!

We included the grant money in all our fundraising totals for the event, but today we got to go to the office to receive the check.  We got to meet Mr. Cesar Claro, who noticed Meghan’s story.  We got to meet Ms. DeSapio who helped us so much via phone and Email.

Meghan took the day off from school, because my speaking time is so limited, and because she’s the reason all this happens anyway.  It was just right for her to be there.

We gathered in a conference room with about 10 incredibly inspirational people.  I loved how professional, yet casual the whole experience was.  Amounts of grants were not discussed.  Checks were distributed in sealed envelopes, but first , everyone spoke about why they were there and how the grant was going to help.

Meghan spoke a little about Cowden’s Syndrome, and how we are hoping the PTEN Foundation will be able to inspire research on our disorder.  She did great, as usual.

We got to hear from a teacher, and his school’s work with Habitat for Humanity.  We heard from “Metropolitan Fire” and how the grant would help their organization.

We got to meet Dennis McKeon From Where To Turn, and hear about the work his organization does on Staten Island.

We heard about the Moravian Church garden and their donations of food.

We met E. Randolph Wheagar from 2nd Chance Youth Empowerment Program, and we were inspired by their community work as well.

We met Jennifer Dudley from Staten Island Children’s Museum and learned about their efforts to “spruce up” the museum.

We met a few other incredible folks as well, one whose organization was obtaining deeds to local neglected cemeteries so they could be maintained.  In the absence of pen and paper a few are slipping my mind, but it was a fantastic experience.  It was an intense 45 minutes!

Perhaps the one that touched our hearts most was Mr. Capolongo who spoke of his son Michael with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.  If you are not familiar with the genetic disorder, you can get some information here. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy  It is a genetic disorder affecting about 1 in 3,500 boys.  The body lack dystrophin, and without it muscle cells become damaged and weaken.  It is progressive.  Michael is 11.  They have 2 other healthy children.  They are a family like ours.  Dad is a policeman, mom is a nurse and a breast cancer survivor. Yet, they have managed to create a not for profit, Michael’s Cause and have raised a million dollars to help fund research, and hopefully, ultimately a cure.

In the 30 minutes we sat across a table I felt inspired, and connected.  I respect so much the positive outlook, and the awareness that even in strife, others have it worse.  I respected the acknowledgement that every day is a gift, and life can change your perspective quickly.  These are things we identify with in this house.  Those are principles we live by.

Meghan and I often feel a little more “at home” in the presence of others with rare disease.  While they are all so drastically different, the difficulty, the fear, the unknown, the isolation, they all overlap.  And what also overlaps are your decisions in how to handle them.

I was reminded of my own girl, at the age of nine telling NY1 that. “You have a choice, you can get angry or you can DO something.”  And, “I feel like I was put here to DO something.”  Watch this clip and reminisce with me.

Today we were full of gratitude.  Today we were inspired by others.  Today we were reminded of our own mission.  Today was a continuation of an ongoing goal,  and a reminder that it matters.  It all matters.

We remain

#beatingcowdens

Rare, Invisible, Real – Jeans for Rare Genes 3

We were worried.  Attendance was at an all-time low.  We had picked a bad weekend, but it was too late to change it.

We took the event off “eventbrite” this year, looking to take the fees they collect and get them to the PTEN Foundation.

It took a whole lot of record keeping, but it was worth it.

We had an “Early Bird Special” and free T-shirts.  We opted for a new venue, a deluxe buffet brunch, and beer, wine and sangria for the grown ups.

After months of planning, of soliciting donations, of advertising, Emailing, and distributing flyers, we had exhausted every avenue we knew.

We received so many generous donations that were accompanied by, “I wish I could, but..”

We received so many well-wishes and positive thoughts from genuine people.

But, in the end we were looking at attendance numbers far lower than last year.

We had excellent baskets – Some were gathered by friends and family. Others were given as donations, and many were put together by my loving husband.

Meghan and I wrote out and carefully planned what we wanted to say.

She opted this year to stray from her pattern of creating videos, and she created a Power Point of the year in review instead.

But, as late as that morning the text and phone calls kept coming from people who could not make it.

We walked into the room anxious.  Not sure of how the day would go.

We should not have worried.

What this crowd may have lacked in volume they more than made up for in LOVE, SUPPORT, GENEROSITY, and COMPASSION.

They were from all areas of our lives.  There were family.  There were lots of cousins.  There were friends.  There were colleagues.  There was Meghan’s Physical Therapist, her math teacher, and her former paraprofessional.  There were friends of friends.  There was Charlie Balloons, and a DJ whose services had been paid by some dear friends as a donation.

There were 42 raffle baskets, and a 50/50.  The money generated just from those two things was mind-blowing.

There were 2 schools, PS1 with cousin Kim, and Holy Rosary with our friend Christal, that each raised over $400 at their schools for the cause.

We laughed.  We drank.  We ate.  We talked.  Kids danced with balloon creations.  There were musical chairs and fun.  There was pure love in the room.

When Meghan and I spoke there was silence.  Attention.  Focus.

Cowden’s Syndrome is understood by this crowd, because of us.

And there stood my daughter, telling this crowd of 100+ that she was tired of “Living with Cowden’s Syndrome.”  She “put Cowden’s Syndrome on notice.”  She told it, it was time to “keep up with her.”  She’s got things to do.  Places to go.  People to see.  She’s growing up right before my eyes.

Not long ago she was a scared and confused 8 year old.  Now she is a wise, and mature beyond her years, 13-year-old young woman.  She wants the PTEN Foundation to flourish.  She wants research, a patient database, and even a cure.  She’s 13.  There is time to get it right for her, and all the young ones being diagnosed after her.  She has drive and ambition.

She chose a song to end her speech.  She chose “Let it Go” from Frozen.  She toyed around with a few songs, but this is the one that spoke to her, at this moment.  This one got to her heart.  And you could tell, as she belted it out acapella.


In the end, as people with full bellies, and big smiles, hugged us goodbye, they spoke of “next year.”  They said this one was “the best yet.” We felt loved and full of gratitude.

And as we sorted through the finances, we were struck with something amazing.  Jeans for Rare Genes 3 would be making a cumulative donation of just over $12,000 to the PTEN Foundation.  This love, this event, these people, the generosity of so many, had generated an amazing amount.

Our hearts are full of gratitude.

A donation of over $12,000 to the PTEN Foundation.  Because of you.

Thank you for valuing a cause that matters so much to my family.  Thank you for loving us.  Thank you for supporting us from near and far.  Thank you for your never-ending generosity.  Thank you for your prayers and good wishes.

Because of you we remain #beatingcowdens!

Thank you!

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Choose Positive….

The day after Christmas in our house is reserved for a blissful amount of peaceful rest.  A few loads of laundry, a simple meal, late sleeping, playing with some new “toys,” recovery, and reflection fill the hours.  It is a wonderful, necessary day to pause and recharge.

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I am awestruck by how fast days blend into weeks, and months, and even years.  My girl is now a young lady.  A young lady of 13 years old with the fall devoted to High School Applications, academic honors, hours of swimming, and some drama (class) thrown in for good measure.  It was a crazy season, but a remarkable, beautiful time of transformation.

I don’t get time to write as much as I used to.  But, truthfully, you don’t need to hear from me all that often to follow along.  The writing remains my way to sort out life.  I feel fortunate that so many of you come along for the ride.

So much of our journey #beatingcowdens is couched in perspective.  We talk so much about the realities of everyone’s life.  We talk about the things people endure that we can not fathom, and we talk about how hard it is to have some of the conversations necessary in the life of my 13-year-old.  We talk.  Often.  And perhaps that is the first of many blessing I have.

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My girl has become a young woman through a path that is different from most her age.  Notice, I deliberately chose the word “different” as we are careful not to measure things in “better” or “worse.”  The medical drama unfolded at a fast, furious pace, most concentrated in the years from 8 to 12.  And we held fast through each one, but then, slowly, the dramas began to slow down.

At first we didn’t want to say anything.  There is the fear of “jinxing” the situation.  When medical drama is your “normal” you don’t really know how to live any other way.  It sounds bizarre.  You want so desperately to be rid of it, but the relief of losing it would be so intense, that to relax and then have it hit you again could be crushing.  So you stay on your guard.  All the time.  But sometimes when you do that you can get a little… I don’t know, isolated, alone, rough?

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There is a security connected to living in a state of medical drama.  At least you know what to expect.

But, it’s not a place to hang out when you don’t need to.

Meghan’s last biopsy was in July.  The follow-up is this week.  My last surgery was in August.  And, in a turn of events here, I have spent the last few months in vocal therapy sorting out ways to work around the tumor that desires to strip me of my ability to communicate.  We’ve had some success, and last week even amidst a terrible head cold, my voice made it with me all the way to Friday.

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And it was on that very Friday morning, as I drove Meghan to a 5:30 AM swim practice, with my head-splitting and my nose running, that I told her how lucky I felt.  She may have checked me for fever, to see if I had totally lost it.  But I explained – a year ago facing Christmas break without her having been knocked down at least once by something major was an impossible dream.  This year, she had done more than ever before, and seems to be getting stronger.  That morning I was grateful that I was able to get my butt out of bed, to take her to the place she loves, so she could work on the sport she loves.

This fall we have successfully removed 2 stomach medications that were previously necessary for survival.  And, we are well on our way to eliminating a third.  There is nutrition, exercise, and natural alternatives in their place.  And it is working.

She came home a few weeks ago with a perfect attendance certificate for the month of October.  I save everything.  I think that may have been her first.  These are the things that keep us in perspective.

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We have a “doctor cycle” among us now.  The knee needs to be checked again, MRI, and two knee doctors.  There are clinical exams, GI follow-up and endocrinology.  The afternoons these next 6 weeks will be swallowed up with trips to NYC.  I’ll add in some appointments of my own, as I prepare for vocal cord surgery, tentatively set, but not yet confirmed.  We’ll keep swimming, literally and figuratively.  We’ll hold each other up, and we will do something a little different.  We will, instead of fitting out lives into the doctors, we will fit the doctors into us.

Raising kids, one, two, three, four, or more- regardless of gender, or age combination each holds unique rewards and challenges.  We have our moments, my girl and I, when we challenge each other to the best we can be.  Sometimes its deep conversation. Sometimes it’s a little less pretty.  But, we do it.  We learn and we grow together.

I find myself often, missing relatives who are not here with us anymore.  I miss conversations, deep and thoughtful.  I miss shared laughs, and the pride they felt and showed.  I understand, and comprehend their lives are changed, their eternal lives are more beautiful than I can imagine.  But, I still miss them.

I sometimes shuffle around a bit in circles in my mind, feeling a little lonely, a little unsteady, and a little unsure of how to break the cycle.

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And even at those loneliest points I take solace at the people in my life who are there.  Their own lives keep us from day-to-day interface, but they are there, forming that net that will catch me, or us, if we were to fall.  They weave a web through our lives that give us such confidence and gratitude, that I can only hope they feel the same way about us.

As we begin to get heavy into the preparations for Jeans for Rare Genes 3,  it is a time to get focused.  I am not a huge fan of New Year’s Resolutions.  A wise friend recently reminded me a calendar is not necessary to begin change.

Choose positive.  That is my simple focus.  I will not be perfect at it.  But, I will work tirelessly.  I will be positive, hopefully not to the point of irritating, but when given the opportunity to face a new situation, I will work to find the positive.

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Cowden’s Syndrome will toss us curve balls for the rest of our days.  I’ve never been much of a baseball player, but I plan to practice my swing.  And just in case- I’ll keep a helmet on as well.

May the culmination of 2016 lead us to gratitude for all the positives it brought, and gratitude for the negatives as well.  May it leave us with the reminders of the blessings in our lives.  Only in appreciation of al of it can we ever move forward.  And really, forward is the only direction I choose to travel.

#beatingcowdens

#everysingleday

#perspective

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Miles to Go…

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September is a marathon of sorts.  Although all the training in the world can never quite prepare you for the twists and turns needed to navigate it through to completion.

September is establishing new routines, in my own classroom, and in our lives.  September is learning new students, and new teachers.

Each year, it is about pushing our bodies farther than we have ever been able to.  It is not just about surgical recoveries, or broken toes, it is about swim.  So much swim.  It’s about swim before sun-up, and afternoons too.  It is about drama and singing and doctors in between.  It’s about finding the inner strength to press on.

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It’s about balancing it all.  Work, school, after school, meetings, and the like.  It’s about stopping to find the beauty, and the sunrise, and the simple pleasures along the way.

This life, this chronically ill life is lonely.  I’m not going to lie, or even try to sugar coat it.  It is lonely.  But, we three in this house embrace and press on.  Because, really, there is no alternative.

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There is no fault, no anger, no resentment.  Reality is that every moment is spent using all the “spoons” we have to get through.  At this moment there are no extras.  Family and friends who comprehend will still be there with open arms when there is a “spoon” or two to spare.  The rest will have found their own way, and that is a loss we will have to take in stride.

Everyone has something.  All lives are busy.  All lives have joy, and angst.  All we can do is take what is in front of us and do the best we can with what we have where we are.

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The worry in my heart runs deep.  There is reason for it, yet I battle it all the time.  It can not, nor will it, define me, or our lives.  Regardless, it lingers always, lurking in the shadows.

My girl continues to amaze and impress with wisdom beyond her years.

For her birthday Meghan had a very specific request this year.  One of her gifts was, “The Unabridged Poetry of Robert Frost.”  I was familiar only with one of his most famous poems.  Meghan read this book fervently for most of August.  I think I understand why now.

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Lab work tomorrow to keep those thyroid hormones in check.  We need our strength to remain

#beatingcowdens