Triage- A Way of Life

Triage.  The word hangs with me like the memories of countless Emergency Room visits.

Triage. Take care of the most serious first.

It’s the reason we might wait hours for stitches, and barely a moment for a trauma.

I get it.  It makes sense in the ER.  It also makes sense on the battlefield, or in other places where there is widespread injury to be treated.

The thing is, you typically don’t stay in those places FOREVER.

Places we equate with triage are not places of comfort.  And that’s where this life with Cowden’s Syndrome can get tricky.

You see, lately I can’t shake the feeling that life is triage.  24/7/365 damage assessment, and handling the most critical first.  Vigilant.  Hyper-vigilant.  ALL.  THE.  TIME.

When you live with a chronic illness, a syndrome that causes cancer by its very definition, it is so easy to get wrapped up in monitoring and preventative care.  And then there are the times that you go for those monitoring appointments and they require their own follow-up.  This condition can easily morph into a beast that can swallow you whole.

And we’re at it times 2.

What I refuse to allow this syndrome to do is take away any more from my daughter’s life  than it has.  To the best of our ability, she will do “teenage” things, and she will do things she enjoys.

But, lately that has become quite the juggling act.

I am monitored twice a year by endocrinology (post thyroidectomy), my breast surgeons, and dermatology.  I am monitored annually by gyn oncology, and oncology.  This is post-bilateral mastectomy (stage 1 DCIS) and post hysterectomy.  I am monitored every 5 years for colonoscopy.  I am also monitored with abdominal ultrasounds for 4 hamartomas on my spleen, and a cyst on my kidney.  This may not seem all that impressive, but those are just the appointments if everything goes well.  That’s not additional scanning, blood work and biopsies.  None of them are close to home either.

Not to mention, I am still searching for a local primary care doctor.  In addition, there is dental work, both routine, and the emergencies the stress from grinding my teeth keep causing.  I’ve been referred to another oncologist who specializes in genetic diseases, and I need to get in to see her.  I just completed vascular surgery, with its pre and post op appointments and recovery as well.

That’s just me.  Me, and my full-time job.  And, like every mother, my needs are not the most important.

My girl sees endocrinology twice a year.  She is still, 4 years post-op, trying to get thyroid function balanced.  She sees gastroenterology, and dermatology twice a year.  She also sees an adolescent gyn twice a year, courtesy of precancerous tissue already uncovered in her teenage uterus.  She sees a chiropractor every 2-3 weeks for pain management.  Right now, amid diagnosis of the small brain tumors, she is seeing neurology every three months for new MRI scans.  She sees orthopedics every 8 weeks.  They have been monitoring her knee for years, and recently stubborn tendonitis in the shoulder.  There have been a few MRIs of late.  She has seen physical therapy weekly since the fall, and is now working on twice a week.

She is tired.  Partially because of her schedule, and partially because of her sleep patterns.  Despite a regular bed time, she struggles to get quality sleep.  It is hard to turn her brain off, and for her to get rest.

She has developed Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and anxiety, secondary to consistent medical trauma.  She is working through it – but, like everything else, it is a great deal of work.

She is awaiting word that her service dog is ready.  The call could come any time in the next 6 or so months, but we are hopeful this dog will help her through what can be some trying times.

She is an honor student.  She is a swimmer – at least 5 days a week, for 12-15 hours a week.  She is in weekly vocal lessons, and a theater group that meets 3.5 hours a week.  She enjoys a local church youth groups.

She has food allergies – restricted from dairy, gluten and soy.  And seasonal allergies to all things pollen.

None of this includes normal things.  Like dentist and orthodontist visits, or even haircuts.

It is easy to get isolated.

She has a strong sense of what is right and wrong, and can be rigid in her perceptions.  But, life has shown her things most adults, let alone people her age, have ever seen.   Just as that strong mindedness flusters me, I refuse to try to break it down.  It is that same will that has gotten us where we are.

And where we are, is in TRIAGE.

My iphone calendar is with me everywhere.  I prioritize swim and theater over doctors when I can.  Physical Therapy is a high on the list right now for pain management and strengthening.

Vocal lessons keep her going, as she can sing herself through a lot of stress.  Theater is just a fun group of children, and I am not willing to sacrifice that.

I have a list by my desk of “next up” appointments, and because our availability is so limited, I am often booking months out.  We travel to most – NYC or LI.  Short on miles – but up to 2 hours each way – often.

We stack them when we can.  Two appointments are a bonus, three is a banner day.

And every year about this time I dream of a summer light on appointments.  I’ve yet to see it come true.  Truth be told, almost every school holiday and every vacation is cluttered with things we need to do, but would rather not.

There is a blessing in knowing what we are fighting.  There is blessing in having a warning system in place.  But, there are still some days when I’m totally overwhelmed that I wish I didn’t know so much.

Triage.

Triage means that right now the physical and emotional health of my teenager trumps all.

So she swims 5 days.  We do PT 1-2 nights after swim. We see “other” doctors midweek on the one day there is no swim.  We do voice, and theater on Saturday.

I make my appointments on weekends when my husband can drive.  I make my appointments a year out so I can stack three in one day in the summer and on February break.  I schedule our surgeries for February of Easter vacation when I can.

I plan our fundraiser now for October, so as not to give it up, but in hopes of finding an easier time.

I research at night.  There is always a need to learn what most of our doctors do not know.

I write, when I can.  I love it and I miss it, but time just doesn’t seem to allow.

Hair, nails, eyebrows, and things I used to enjoy are forced into holes in the calendar, every once in a while.

Dust builds in places I never used to allow it.

Friends, well I have to trust they get it and they’ll be around when there is a change in the current status of things.  I miss them.

Triage.

It starts early in the morning, waking up a teen who just hasn’t slept well.

It continues through the day – my job and her school.

After school is all about making it work.  Swim, PT, or whatever therapy the night brings.

There are often phone calls, requests for lab reports, or battles about IEP needs…  Emails go through the iphone.

Usually we are out of the house about 13 hours.

At night we pack everything so that we can be ready to begin again.

Triage.

Most critical right now is allowing my teenager to find her way, in school, in sports, and in her life.  Most critical is giving her very real scenarios where her disease does not define her, and she is able to achieve in spite of her challenges, not because of them.

In order to make this happen, everything revolves around her schedule.  There are opinions about that in all directions.  There are people who would tell me I am creating an entitled, self-absorbed human.  I don’t pay them much mind, because they haven’t met her.

When I signed in to be a parent I knew I’d be all in.  I just never saw THIS coming.

Balance needs to always be in place, where the physical needs of either of us are never overlooked.  However, non-essential appointments CAN, and WILL be scheduled around our availability.  She will be a happier, and more tolerant patient when she didn’t miss something she loved with three hours in traffic and two in the waiting room.

Triage is meant to be something you experience briefly in times of crisis.

The “fight or flight” response is not always supposed to be on.

But it is.

At this time in our lives we may not always make for stellar company, although ironically, we’d love to have more of it.

At this time, we may say no constantly, to the point where you stop inviting.  Trust me.  We’d rather go.  We actually enjoy your company.

At this time, we are so busy surviving, and taking care of the most critical needs, that anything not immediately essential gets passed by.

We are constantly evaluating order of events, but TRIAGE is fluid by definition.  Unfortunately there are so many situations and scenarios, it is hard to see through them all.

Even at our toughest times.  Even at our most overwhelmed days.  We can look around and find our blessings.  They exist in big things, like being able to physically attend 5 practices a week, and little things, like being able to WALK around the school without hesitation or assistance.

We are aware of those suffering illnesses far beyond our grasp.  We are aware and we are grateful for the health we do have.

We are also tired.  And lonely.  And often overwhelmed.  We also know this is the way the plan must go for now.  And one day it may change.

Triage is fluid.

Life is fluid.

We all do the best we can with what we have where we are.

And we remain steadfast

#beatingcowdens.

 

 

Ice Cream for Dinner

You have to give the body what it needs.  Tonight mine needs ice cream.  With hot fudge.

Normally I’m a protein shake, green tea kind of gal.  But I don’t really believe in drawing hard lines anywhere, because hey – you never know.

Today was day 3 of a seemingly impossible root canal.  Our very capable dentist deemed it in the 5% of root canals he has to send out.  That was after almost 90 minutes in his chair 2 weeks ago.

The root canal specialist looked at it and validated the dentist.  She said he was right.  It was going to be tough.  That was just the consult.

Last Tuesday, and again tonight I spent an hour each time with my back lower left molar being attacked.  My jaw hurts.  My face aches.  To hear it wasn’t finished was no fault of the dentist.

It was “odd,” “unusual,” and “the most difficult root I’ve faced in a while.”

Blah, Blah, Blah…

She has to talk to the dentist to decide the fate of my less than one year old crown.  In my gut I’m not so sure the tooth will survive.  Time will tell.

My girl, thankfully used Uber to get home from school, so that she could get the dogs ready.  Lucky, our older dog had a consultation to consider surgery to remove a mass on her side.  She’s 12.5, bloodwork to determine if she’s a candidate will be in Friday.

And that’s just the normal, happens to everyone stuff that has gone on this week.  Is it really only Wednesday?

One day at a time I keep reminding myself.

We re-upped our commitment to Physical Therapy last night after a visit with the orthopedist last week.  He voted for 12 more weeks for the shoulder tendonitis and the possible “plica” in the (formerly) GOOD left knee.  Thank GOD for Dr. Jill.  Without her knowledge, patience, humor, adaptability, passion and skill I have no idea where we’d be.

He also asked for an MRI of the left knee “just in case.”  It’s on hold for now.  We are literally in a point in life where we have to conserve scans.

The brain MRI is February 20th and that has to be priority.

January 17th we saw the adolescent gynecologist.  She reorganized the hormones, and put in the order for an abdominal sonogram.  Its time to check and make sure that uterus is behaving.  As soon as we can get it on the calendar.

calendars

I sent a lengthy summary of 2017 to her geneticist asking that he reevaluate a few areas of concern.  I sent the Email Sunday.  By Monday I had been politely dismissed.

All my hopes rest with the pediatric endocrinologist.  Appointment is 2/9.  He’s gotten a few articles and knows I’ll be pleading for a trial of an alternative thyroid medicine.

I’m starting to lose faith in the medical professionals we see.  And I had thought we’d conjured up a great team.

Cowden’s Syndrome is time-consuming and exhausting.  It’s hard to see unless you’re in the middle of it.

And sometimes when you can see it every day – because you have to- you know that sometimes you need ice cream for dinner.

And that’s perfectly ok.  I may even go add a glass of wine.

#beatingcowdens

Change- The Only Constant

Wild.  These last few weeks have been just that.

I’m always amazed at exactly how much can fit into hours or days.  Sometimes I try to recap a day, and find myself shaking my head.

Meghan is in high school.

I feel like we’ve been looking at high schools since January.  We had it figured out by May.  So we thought.  September 15th is ok too.  Because the plan was clearly not ours to make, and like so many other things was guided by a higher power.

It’s not the high school she planned to attend.  It’s not even the high school she started in September.  But, on day 8 – she enrolled in a school a few miles away.  The reasons are irrelevant.  The outcome is what matters.

Currently her school mascot is the “Warrior.”  Somehow that seems remarkably appropriate.

She is catching up on notes missed the first 8 days.  She is organizing in a way that only she has, and getting herself set up.  She functions largely alone now.  Years of supporting schoolwork have paid off.

September is chaos.  Pure chaos.  21 years of Septembers, 14 of them as a mom and a teacher.  Not a single one gets easier.  No matter how many years I do it.  The new schedules, the logistics of organizing, and establishing routines, both at work and at home can generate extra gray hairs at the thought.

The only thing the same is the chaos.  And the inevitable illness.

The weakened immune system, and maybe the ragweed allergy, means there is never a September I can recall for her with perfect attendance – or without a sinus infection.

There are so many things packed into a day.  Sometimes I can’t think more than a few hours ahead because it gives me a headache.

Right now there is swim.  A whole lot of swim.  There is swim for her 12 month team, and there is high school swim.  There is practice for both.  There are meets several times a week.  I think there is an 11 day stretch in October where there will be 8 meets.

 

There are new friends.  There is a team.  There are old friends reunited.  There are kind people.  In so many ways there is some peace.  Finally.

Except 7 days of 9th grade (actually 6- the sinuses sidelined her today) don’t, or can’t make it all ok.

While my girl works to establish herself as an athlete, a student, and a generally nice human in her new school, she continues to battle every moment with her health.

And because it is that “invisible illness” kind of battle, no human would imagine what it takes for her to get through these days.

She sleeps poorly, struggling for hours each night to settle the pain in her body and the activity in her mind.  She wakes fatigued, and with great effort.

Her pill case overflows – thyroid medicines- 2 kinds, allergy medicines – a pill and 2 nasal sprays, antivirals, medicine for reflux.  Currently another (sigh) antibiotic, and a short course of a steroid for the sinuses.  Strong probiotics, a multivitamin, and a few others, all cross her lips every day.  Each one carries with it its own set of risks and side effects.  Yet, we have had to make the decision each time that the benefits outweigh the risks.  There is a lot of trading “this for that”  that you do when you have Cowden’s Syndrome.  It’s a dicey game.  There are no right answers, and every educated guess could backfire.

The medication leaves her more tired.

The thyroid being gone during these years was necessary torture.

She is gaining back strength lost during months off her normal routine this spring.  The knee is back to allowing her activity, but the body continues to prefer the development of one side.  The difference is so subtle to the eye, but to her it feels so much more.  The right side lags behind.

The foot is smaller and more narrow on that side as well.  It leaves her stride off.  Again she compensates.  Again she aches.

The chiropractor readjusts about twice a month, sometimes more.

The backpack is heavy.  Everything throws off the stride.

The sneakers are carefully chosen.  I shudder at the thought of shopping for dress shoes for my tall, thin, beautiful girl to be “party ready.”

The stomach, once improving, seems to be back on strike.  The pain is more frequent.  The heartburn, once gone, creeps into life more regularly.  But, as is the story of the chicken and the egg, trying to tease of which medicines are causing what is no easy task.

There is no “typical” 14 year old girl.

There is no “typical” Cowden’s Syndrome patient.

We are all just trying to figure it out the best we can with what we have, where we are.

There has been a lot of talk lately about disclosure, and the internet.  There is no real way of teasing apart what is syndrome related and what just is.  Meghan and I tell this somewhat censored, but typically brutally honest version of our struggles, not because we think others have it better, or worse, or even the same, but rather to validate that Cowden’s Syndrome is real.  It doesn’t take a holiday.  It affects every day and every decision we make.

I have a follow up from my voice surgery this coming week.  I’m not so sure how it’ll go.  All that back to school talking, even with the head microphone, has been tough.

I scheduled my next vascular surgery for February 21st. Exactly enough time to stay wrapped for 5 days and make it back to work on the 26th.  They thought I was nuts.  The leg hurts now.  But, the luxury of time needs to be saved for things that can’t wait.

The only thing constant is change.

The shell of it all remains the same, but the logistics and decisions forming the web get increasingly complex.

Yet, we need to remember, in the midst of the regular chaos, and the medical chaos, to stop, or at least to pause.  And sometimes, maybe a sinus infection is how the universe forces the pause…

Change is constant, but we remain

#beatingcowdens

through it all.

 

“… Turn on the Light!” -Albus Dumbledore (J.K. Rowling)

Last week my daughter pulled on a shirt before we headed out to the doctor for the umpteenth time this summer.  I didn’t think much of it at first.  I was grateful she was dressed and pulled together, and ready without event.  As a matter of fact, I was in full on grown up mode, rushing her almost 5’8″ frame and her crutches along to get us prepared for the obligatory ridiculous traffic as we traveled what seems to be the longest 30 miles ever.

I don’t think I even read the shirt until we were in the waiting room a few hours later.

I had read the Harry Potter series as each book came out – beginning as a 5th grade teacher more than 20 years ago.  My daughter enjoyed the series in its entirety in a brief period during her year in second grade.  I enjoyed the books, each one, but it took a reread or two to analyze things on a deeper level for me.  Dumbledore, the wise guide had an infinite amount of wisdom to offer.

Whether she realized it or not, my girl was sending a message that morning – to both of us.  There is an ongoing battle, here, and I suspect in many lives, to live the days as they come.  We try to “get out of our own way” and “our own head” as the case may be.  And it is not easy.  When we look further ahead than the day, sometimes even the hour, or moment, it is easy to get swallowed up.  The darkness comes hard and fast.  Too many appointments, too much worry, too many “what ifs,”  too much time wasted, too many plans unfulfilled.  No one likes the dark.

So don’t stay there.  Turn on the light.

Thank you J.K. Rowling, for giving us Albus Dumbledore.

That appointment Tuesday, it wasn’t great.  There are still no real answers.  There is swelling on the knee.  There is pain.  There was confusion from the surgeon.  He decided we had rested the knee.  Now, it was time to add two medications to treat the knee, a neoprene sleeve for swim, and PT back in the equation.  For 2 weeks we will move it and see if that helps.  Nothing more than educated guesswork.

I hate it when we have to guess.  But, I am grateful for a surgeon willing to logically troubleshoot.  We visit him again in 2 weeks.  He is confused, but he is smart.  And he will not quit.

So with a surgeon who made the choice to keep working on it – my girl did the same.  Every day we have choices to make… all day… every day.  Those choices shape and mold us.

My daughter was to be part of a beloved theater group these first two weeks of July.  Some of the most compassionate, talented and caring young people are in that group, guided by adults that are not afraid to give everything they have for the betterment of the children in their charge.  Last year, she had arguably one of the best experiences of her life, and when the word came that she could not participate, that the knee was not prepared for that amount of standing – she was crushed.  But, being who they are, the staff, and the students alike not only allowed her, but welcomed her to be with them during rehearsals.  As we watched two amazing performances of “Aladdin Jr.” on Friday night, I know she wished to be on the stage, but the pure joy of excitement for the success of these children – her peers- was evident.

She could have sat home and sulked.  They could have said she could not come.  Instead, the best possible outcome came from unfortunate circumstances.  Another major life lesson.  Executed flawlessly.

My daughter has dreams.  Big dreams.  She aspires to be a better human, and to assist those who struggle.  She wants to learn her voice, and sing to the best of her ability.  She desires to perform, on stage, often.  She seeks venues for community outreach and has goals to raise awareness and funds to cure PTEN Mutations like our Cowden’s Syndrome, and other rare diseases.  She strives to be an athlete.  The same thrill of competition that creates great anxiety, lights a fire deep in her soul.  She also has hopes, standards, and expectations for herself.  She actually, most days, can do a lot of the parenting work without me.  But, sometimes when those dreams and goals are forced to pause, and rest for whatever issue is going after the body at that time, its nice to remember the words of Dumbledore, “It does not do to dwell on dreams and forget to live.  Remember that.”


Exact, precise language.  That is how my girl likes it.  We sometimes kid that she will be an attorney.  At the very least, an advocate for herself, and maybe others.  There is little gray area with Meghan.  She likes people who are kind.  She does not like people who are not.  End of story.

Or is it?  In this age of adolescence there are times when lines are clear, and times when they are blurry.  Emotions run high.  There are times when things are said, and done that are deliberate, and mean and awful, and other times where things FEEL deliberate and mean and awful where that was not the intention.

That changes things for the speaker, but rarely for the recipient.  With intent being often left to the interpretation of the recipient,  words can cut more sharply than a sword, and pierce the soul and the spirit.  Words hold great power.

The absence of words, those kind sentiments, thought, but never spoken, can injure as well.

My girl is far from perfect.  I myself am far from perfect.  We have many conversations between ourselves about the power of words.  Sometimes we hurt each other’s feelings.  Usually we talk it through.  Our relationship invariably gets stronger.

That’s because we speak.  And we hear.  So many times when words have hurt, a conversation could clarify so much.  An honest reflection that not a single one of us is perfect in our speech or actions is invaluable for growth.  Friendships grow, not over text messages through an iPhone screen, or photo exchanges… friendships grow when we take the time to talk, and laugh, and listen and hear and care.

And, perhaps many times, when you are lonely or simply alone, those are the times words, or their absence, can hold the greatest power.

Nature vs. Nurture.

An especially complex conversation in light of genetic discoveries happening every day.

In this house my daughter, although she first learned of it as she turned 8, was born with Cowden’s Syndrome- a PTEN Mutation leading to a high incidence of benign and malignant tumor growth.  She was born with this condition, because I was born with this condition.  That statistics and numbers are real.  They are hard core.  They are disturbing.

A 2012 article about PTEN related cancer risks.

However, because we are BORN with this Syndrome, it does not mean we will develop every possible manifestation.  We have AVMs and thyroid issues, and lipomas, but of yet, no colon issues at all.  I had breast cancer, early stage.  So did my mom who is not a PTEN patient.  We have large head size, but not autism.  You get the idea.

I believe we are born with certain things.  I believe that Meghan and I were born with Cowden’s Syndrome, and I even have theories about its origin.

I also believe that EVERYONE has something.  We are either born with it, or it develops.  Whether it is a physical ailment, or an unfortunate circumstance, there are forces affecting each of us.

Life is not smooth.  But within life there are choices.  Every day there are choices.

Choose kindness.

Choose compassion.

Choose love.

Choose forgiveness.

Choose happiness.

Choose to find your “Never Give UP.”

Choose to trust.

Choose to take risks.

Choose to care.

Choose to push yourself.

Choose to believe you can.

Knowing, that sometimes those choices will hurt.  Sometimes they will leave you angry or even furious.

Know in your heart that those are the only choices.

As you “grow to be…” it is those choices that will help you navigate the path to be the very best version of yourself.

Some people go their whole lives and never meet their hero.  I gave birth to mine, and her stamina and drive continue to inspire me daily.

#beatingcowdens

A Perfect Storm

 

Sitting, sopping wet, in the middle of the ocean, in your small row boat.  Your feet are wet.  Your fingers are wrinkled.  You are cold, exhausted, and often frightened.  There is no access to the weather channel.  Your connections to the real world have all but vanished.  You focus every ounce of your strength on keeping the boat afloat.

You try to maintain a sense of calm, but your insides are turning worse than after a serving of spoiled mayonnaise at a summer barbecue.

There are moments when you think.  Hope.  Pray.  That it will settle down.  There are moments when you dream of enough sunshine to shed your wet clothes and warm and dry yourself.  There are moments when you can almost see what appears to be a friendly ship in the distance.  And in those fleeting moments you even remember what it felt like to socialize, to chat, and to laugh – about every day life.

Your faith reminds you that Jesus is in the back of that boat.  You know better than to let your insecurities wake Him.  You know in your core that you are loved, and protected.  

And then another wave crashes over the side.  You can not put your hand on the oar.  You lock eyes with your husband in front of you – always with you.  You put a hand on your girl, sopping wet beside you.  You strengthen your resolve.  

I have been fading out of touch these last few months.

I love writing.  It is my therapy and my release.  It clears my mind and cleanses my soul.  Except there is a balancing act to be had -tenuously protecting privacy while fulfilling what we believe is our calling to share a raw, honest view of our lives “Beating Cowdens.”It is hard to realize breaks in time.  Things blend together so readily it is hard to discern where one event starts and another stops.  There is only rarely a pause between medical appointments, some for the same issues, some for new ones, and others for maintenance.  Some appointments are mine, and some belong to Meghan.  All but a few require hours and hours of travel.  It safe to say they cost us on average 5 hours a day.  But, those 5 hours are not of my choosing.  I can’t say, decide to get up at 5 – deal with the appointment and be ready to start the day at 10.  That’s just not how it works.  Most are scheduled somewhere between 10 and 3.  That means by the time we get home, there isn’t much time to do anything.  Or, we spend the day waiting to go – so there isn’t much to get done.  There are no summer day trips planned.  Making plans to catch up with friends is something we avoid – because we so often have to cancel.  The cycle continues.  There is just getting by.  And some dreams that maybe we can get to the beach one day this summer…

Somewhere early this year Meghan started to be done with it all.  This is not an easy place to be in by any means.  She is a month shy of 14, and this is her journey for the REST of her life.  Teenage years are nothing most of us would want to revisit.  The extra complications of finding your way amidst a chronic sense of isolation (the knee precludes too much walking, it prevents basic sports games most of the time, it leaves the competitor side-lined too much, the allergies mean the food has to be different, the pain is unusual and constant and managed in some “unorthodox” ways, the number of times she has to say “no” because she has an appointment, an ER visit, or something else medical is astounding and limits the invitations, ETC., ETC…) coupled with an understandably defensive posture, and a desire to just BE, can make for some lonely times.

 

Her sleep patterns went off the charts some time in February.  My sleeper just couldn’t fall asleep.  She’d lay still for hours.  Her pattern was restless and fitful.  I watched my girl pull away from her swimming.  I fought to push her.  Even after her best meet ever in March – I could no  longer get her up to a morning practice.

Meanwhile, I never made connections that are so clear now.  In January we were released from the Interventional Radiologist who had completed the 5 embolizations over 6 years on the AVM in her right knee.  He released us to the care of the orthopedist who had already performed an arthroscopic lateral release in 2015 to help shift her patella into place.  It had begun to slide as a result of residual damage from small amounts of lingering blood in the knee.  By early this year the warning signs had begun to develop that the knee was off.

A visit to the orthopedist in February confirmed what Meghan undoubtedly knew.  He offered her the chance to try to intervene conservatively and put a brace on to hold the patella in place.  Maybe it could “convince it” to move on its own…

She took it in stride, like always.  We bought leggings to accommodate the giant addition to her thin frame.  She dug in and pressed on.

While all this was going on the chronic congestion that had begun in November worsened.  The ENT noted swelling, but called it allergies, the obvious choice this season.  There was a nasal spray added, and a week of a decongestant.

Attendance in school started to be a struggle.  There was fatigue.  Low grade infections.  There was pain.  So much pain.

The chiropractor visits became more frequent.  The leg length discrepancy made more noticeable by the limping to accommodate the brace on the shifted knee cap.

My surgery in March helped nothing.  There was so much vocal rest required it tossed us all on edge more than normal.

Swim practice was lessening.  Focusing on school was a chore.  Sleep was becoming near impossible.

The breathing worsened.  We justified the “worst allergy season ever.”  Her voice started to feel the effects of this chronic congestion.

In April the inevitable was spoken.  The knee would need a repeat of the 2015 arthroscopic lateral release.  We wanted to schedule it immediately.  The first available day was her the opening night of her school play, a play she had earned the lead in.  The next opening was almost a month later on May 20th.  We would have to wait.

The pain increased.  The frustration increased.  The sleep, and subsequently the desire to swim decreased.

The “Coaches Award” at the swim dinner made her feel honored.  She respects her coach so much.  But, she couldn’t reignite the fire.

The surgery in May went well, even though I had worried with the increased congestion that they could not put her under anesthesia.  But, it was fine.  She went through the 2 hours like a seasoned veteran.  That made number 18.

Rehab was tough.  The pain was significant.  But, it faded gradually.  Our favorite PT began to work her magic.

She got around on crutches, figured it out and made it work.  Again.  Always.

She got off the crutches exactly in time for 8th grade prom.

 

She was healing.  Physically.

She made it back into the water.  She swam the 18th of June, and the 19th too.  She started to talk about it in a more positive way.  The 20th was awards night for 8th grade.

My 8th grader was named Salutatorian for a graduating class of almost 400.  She received several academic awards that night. I sat in the auditorium with the last few months, and years running through my mind.  People knew some, but no one, not even I knew ALL of what it took to be her, every day.  And here she was, not only doing it, but excelling at it.  It was a good night.

Until she came home, and put up her feet.  And there, on the side of her surgical leg was a 4cm x 6cm mass, with rapidly increasing swelling.  Breathing, we strategized.

We took the crutches back out.  I stayed up most of the night making sure there was no bleed on the knee.  I sent her to school the next day to get her cap and gown and yearbook “like everyone else.”

Then we headed to the surgeon.  His nurse practitioner sent us to the ER.  They could not get their acts together and after 7 hours discharged her on crutches with a script for an MRI.

 And an IV that went unused…

She was to be “minimal weight bearing as tolerated.”  They wanted her back at the doctor that Friday.  I finally spoke up and said no.  She was going to her graduation Friday – NOT tainted by a medical appointment.  We settled on Tuesday.

However, with no answer, she was to graduate on crutches.  So, a friend suggested if she had to use them, she should “own” them.  My husband spray painted them white.

Sunday we drove to Long Island for that MRI.  The one I knew they would not do locally.  30 miles.  2 hours and 15 minutes home.  We caught up with some friends that day.  Good thing.  We needed them so badly.

As she was in the MRI machine for her knee she told me something was “blocking” her nose inside her head.  If you’re a Cowden’s Mom – you just went to tumor as fast as I did.  My head spun.

Monday the ENT was able to ease that worry.  He told us it was a mass of infection.  That likely she had had a severe sinus infection for 8-10 weeks.  He anticipated 14-28 days on biaxin to get after it.  That was alongside a short course of oral prednisone.  He nose was so inflamed there was almost no air passing.

A sinus infection usually has me out of commission in about 3 days.  I just shake my head in awe sometimes.

Tuesday the 27th we trekked out to the surgeon again.  The MRI showed the mass to be a huge fluid filled pocket.  There is also fluid all through the knee joint.  He looked, and looked.  He has done many surgeries.  He is skilled.  He shook his head and finally told us he did not understand.  He had “never” seen this before.  And now we had to wait for her knee to tell us what to do next.

Cancel camp.  No Drama Camp she had loved so much.

Postpone PT indefinitely.

No swim practice yet.

And there we were – facing another summer…

But somehow, all of this seemed to weave together.  The perfect storm.  The knee, the sinuses, the sleeplessness, the fatigue, the low-grade illnesses, the sinus infection…

Somewhere through all this we spent a few visits with a brilliant doctor who diagnosed Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.  PTSD.  Like with the soldiers, or other trauma victims.  “Secondary to significant medical trauma” she said.

It all made sense, except the “post.”  There is nothing really “post” about this ongoing scenario.

That, and the Salutatorian thing.  As impressed as I am – I am still in awe.

The journey continues, and we will above all things remain…

#beatingcowdens

Middle School is Hard

Middle School is hard.

If you’ve ever had a middle school student in your world, you know what I mean.  Like everything in life, the feelings are different for each of them, but if you’ve recently had someone pass through 6th, 7th, or 8th grade, you have undoubtedly  been with them through some trying times.

And that’s without factoring in the Cowden’s Syndrome.  Middle School saw 7 surgeries in 3 years.  It started with a broken foot and ended with Graduation on crutches for some extreme, and as of yet, unexplained knee swelling.

It also culminated with my girl as the Salutatorian of a class of close to 400.  At awards night Tuesday she received several other awards as well.  And, not a single one was connected in any way to the obstacles she overcame to get there.  It was a proud moment.  The desire of my teenager is to not ever be defined by her disease.  She wants no pity.  She’d love compassion.  Empathy, not sympathy.  She wants to achieve in spite of her obstacles and never BECAUSE of them.

As her Mom, I am insanely proud.  I am also inspired.  Every day we wake with a choice to make.  “The body achieves what the mind believes.”

Her mind believes that she will continue to overcome.  I have no doubt.  High School is on the horizon, and while I have no idea what the next few years have in store, I am confident she will continue to achieve success in all she does.

Cowden’s Syndrome messed with the wrong young lady.

The text of her speech from graduation is below:

Welcome and good evening, Mr. Mele, the administration and teachers from IS51, parents, family and guests, and most importantly, the graduating class of 2017!

 

Heh. I remember thinking to myself before I knew I’d be up here speaking to you today, “Wow, I feel sorry for the poor sap that is going to speak at graduation.” Yea, the universe has a funny sense of humor, doesn’t it? I’ve never been much of a writer, but I hope I at least don’t bore you to sleep. So, fellow classmates, here’s my attempt at leaving you with something “profound.”

 

This poem is called “The Victor.”

 

“If you think you are beaten, you are
If you think you dare not, you don’t,
If you like to win, but you think you can’t
It is almost certain you won’t.

If you think you’ll lose, you’re lost
For out of the world we find,
Success begins with a fellow’s will
It’s all in the state of mind.

If you think you are outclassed, you are
You’ve got to think high to rise,
You’ve got to be sure of yourself before
You can ever win a prize.

Life’s battles don’t always go
To the stronger or faster man,
But soon or late the man who wins
Is the man WHO THINKS HE CAN!”

 

Walter D. Wintle

 

Smart man.  

 

As I stand here today getting ready for all of us to move on to high school, I’ll say Congratulations! We’re done!

 

You might expect me to reminiscine about all the amazing memories I have of the last three years of middle school. While there were some good times, I’m not going to lie, middle school was three of the most difficult years of my life so far, and I’m sure I’m not the only one who shares that sentiment.

 

Middle school is hard, and some times can be super taxing. In addition to figuring out the school, the teachers, and the classwork, we have had to figure out ourselves, and each other. 

 

Let’s be real here. Bullying is a real part of these years.  Many of us have experienced it, and it hurts your self-esteem and diminishes your self worth. When people have hurt you enough, you can easily want to give up. Even if you can do it, your brain can become convinced you can’t. Therefore, you will fail. It’s cliché, but true. The body achieves what the mind believes.

 

The first step to winning, to taking that final step into your full potential, is believing in yourself.

 

That’s the trick.  The way to overcome the feelings of loneliness and isolation is to alter and control your state of mind. Your state of mind, and hard work, together form the key to accomplish your goals.

 

Now, while I’m here talking to you about a “winning state of mind.” I’d just like to put the disclaimer out there that I haven’t even close to succeeded in this mentality yet. But, I’m working on it. It’s hard. But, most things that are worth it are hard.

 

I once had a friend tell me something at one of our swim meets that I’ll never forget.  She said to me, “Stop. Breathe. Focus.”  Since I respect her ability in our sport so much, I shut up, and listened. It was one of the best things I ever did and it worked.

 

You see, I’m not talking to you about nonsense. As you head off into your high school, wherever it may be, you are likely to be at least a little nervous.  Remember, that your mind is extremely complex, and it controls and affects more than we could ever realize.

 

So, if you find yourself feeling like you’re not good enough.  If you find yourself worrying too much about what others think of you, or if you find yourself feeling like you are destined to fail, remember to “Stop. Breathe. Focus.”  You are enough just the way you are.  And, don’t worry, I’ll be standing in the halls of Port trying to take my own advice.

 

                                                    

Thank you, and once again, congratulations to the graduates.

 

#beatingcowdens

It’s Not Over Yet…

Tonight my search for perspective was harder than it normally is.

Tonight I needed a glass (or two) of wine, some time alone in my office, and plenty of music.

And as the lyrics roll through my head in the eclectic mess that spans, Contemporary Christian, Classic Rock, and some alternative memories from back in the day, I somehow start to find myself again.

I am generally a very positive person.  I am able to find blessings in unlikely and hard to reach places.  I make a point of focusing on these things for so many reasons.  Primarily, I find it is necessary to be positive for my health.  While I don’t believe a positive attitude alone will cure illness, I do firmly believe a negative one, or a constant state of stress and worry can worsen illness.  We certainly don’t need that.

But, lately I’ve been frustrated.  I’m even a little angry.  You see – everything is NOT fine.

And I’ve been avoiding my computer because I’d rather write when my perspective is in its proper place.  One of the reasons I love to blog is because I can get right in my head by the time I’m done.  I can typically work through whatever is gnawing at me.

There are drafts in my folder.  Unpublished, unfinished work.  I’ve tried, but I’m struggling.

Logic leads me to retrace the obvious.

In our house the diagnoses came about five and a half years ago.  I was 38 and Meghan was 8.

In most of the people I’ve interfaced with who have Cowden’s Syndrome, their diagnosis is less than 10 years old.  I know there are others, but this is the majority.

There is a growing group of us who are parents.  Now, in my case, my diagnosis was made BECAUSE of Meghan’s.  But, in many cases the opposite is true.  There comes a point where the signs are either apparent, or subtle, and something prompts the formal diagnosis of PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndrome, in some form, in our children.

Anecdotally, we are not the only house where the syndrome seems to manifest worse a generation down.  This is a story I have heard many times.

There is a special kind of knot that forms in your stomach and lingers, forever, when you realize that you are somehow responsible, in an unintentional, yet undeniable way.  Your child has this syndrome because, even with a current estimate of a 1 in 200,000 diagnosis it is an autosomal dominant condition, which means that if you have the mutated PTEN gene, 50% of the time, it will pass to your child.

Between us, since Meghan was born in 2003 there have been 30 or more trips to an operating room.  On 18 of those visits I have watched my girl head into surgery.

And I know all the blessings bestowed upon us.  I know the beauty of benign biopsies, and the gratitude of legs that allow for walking when the alternative has certainly been possible.  I know the strength and resilience of my daughter, and the grace of God alone.  I know the grit of a child just out of her 7th knee surgery who understands the recovery process better than any PA she will meet in the surgeon’s office.  I know the feeling of bruises on my knees as I give thanks for my child who is ABLE to recover.  I get it.  I truly do.  I’m grateful.  I am.

But, you know what else?  Sometimes I get angry.  And, that’s OK too.

I’m learning that part of being able to be positive is allowing myself to FEEL and WORK THROUGH ALL the emotions that come my way.  Even the ones that hurt.  Even the ugly ones that don’t have flowers and rainbows attached.

This is reality.  This is our reality.  And I am not about comparisons.  I do not profess to understand anyone else’s reality any more than I could expect them to understand mine.  I do not use words like “worse” or “better” or “harder” or “easier” or “fair” or “unfair.”

What I can tell you about our reality is that 18 is too many surgeries for a 13-year-old girl.

I can also tell you there will be more.  For both of us.

Vigilance, a necessary reality to keep us in front of the astronomical cancer risks associated with Cowden’s Syndrome will lead to more surgery.  And we will hope and pray each is followed by a benign biopsy, or an encouraging word from an orthopedic surgeon trying to preserve a knee damaged by a mischievous AVM.

When I got my diagnosis, I was almost 40.  I was married.  I had a little girl.  I had a home.  A career.

When my girl received her diagnosis she was in 3rd grade.

Swallow that.

It doesn’t taste very good.

Cowden’s Syndrome is isolating.  In addition to numerous food issues, and immunological issues, and significant knee trouble (understatement of the year,)  there are SO MANY doctor’s appointments.  There are countless blood draws.  There are so many days I pick her up at school and we do ANOTHER 4-5 hours round trip in the car, traveling to NYC, sitting in traffic, parking, waiting, sitting in more traffic…

As connected as social media can help you be, there is a lack of connectedness that is inherent with not being there.  Being absent.  Being unable to go on certain trips.  Being unable to do the things kids your age can do…

When I was a child I always “knew” something was wrong with the ridiculous number of surgeries I had, but it was different.  It was not the same as knowing for sure that your genetic mutation was going to guide portions of your life whether you like it or not.

When you have one thing wrong, whether you break an arm, or have your wisdom teeth out, or your tonsils, people seem to know what to say.  When you constantly have something wrong, some type of surgery, or some type of recovery on the agenda, it gets harder for everyone.

People don’t know what to say.  So they don’t…

Cowden’s Syndrome can be very isolating.

What about our children?  What about our children who are being diagnosed younger and younger?  To some extent, yes, “Knowledge is Power,” but at what cost?

We are forced to make the logical choice for necessary screening appointments, and often surgery, while often having to skip social, cultural, or sporting events.

We are forced to say no to social engagements so often, that people forget to keep asking.

Our youngest children at diagnosis may not fully understand the scope of what is now their’s.  But, they will.  If they have a parent with the same syndrome they will watch.  Everything.  If they are the first in the family they will piece it together.  Really there comes a point there is no keeping it from them.  Then what?

I am blessed with a young lady who reads like a book-worm, and has a solid comprehension of people, personalities, and her environment.  I am left only with the option to tell her the truth.

Sometimes the truth gets stuck in your throat, burns a bit, or leaves some nasty reflux.  Yet, still that bitter pill is the only one we’ve got.

I sometimes wonder how different things could have been, if…

But it is my girl who stops me.  Without this diagnosis she knows I would not be here.  My breast cancer was uncovered by her diagnosis and that diagnosis undoubtedly saved my life.  Without Cowden’s Syndrome she knows she would have become someone different.  Someone else.  And that wouldn’t have been right.

While I don’t believe in a God who wants us to suffer, I believe in one who uses that suffering to allow us to become a better version of ourselves.

My girl started Junior High with a broken foot.  During her 3 years there she endured less than perfect social relationships (read, a few very mean children and my child who didn’t always have the patience to contend with teenage normalcy) and 7 surgeries.  SEVEN. Seven recoveries, and pre and post operative visits too.  She did that while holding an average of well over 95% every single marking period.  She did that while making enormous strides as a competitive swimmer.  She did that while learning that she had a the voice of a singer hiding inside.  She did that while performing in several productions, practicing after school for months each year.  She did that while spearheading 3 successful PTEN Fundraisers, essentially putting Cowden’s Syndrome in the vocabulary of our community.  She’s ending Junior High on crutches.  Unfortunate bookends, or a reminder of the strength and resilience of a young lady who refuses to be defined by her disease.

I am sometimes not even sure if she is aware of her accomplishments, as she is so busy pushing onward to stop and notice.

Who sets the example here?

I guess I need to stop hiding from my computer.  Perspective never really leaves.  Sometimes it just needs to be worked through.

This diagnosis stinks.  This syndrome is a real bear to contend with.  It is lonely and isolating and leaves little time to even see family, let alone friends. However, as the saying goes –

And that is probably the real perspective.

And almost as if perfectly timed, I found my title for this blog – as the Pandora radio plays..

“They are inside your head
You got a voice that says
You won’t get past this one
You won’t win your freedom

It’s like a constant war
And you want to settle that score
But you’re bruised and beaten
And you feel defeated

This goes out to the heaviest heart

Oh, to everyone who’s hit their limit
It’s not over yet
It’s not over yet
And even when you think you’re finished
It’s not over yet
It’s not over yet
Keep on fighting
Out of the dark
Into the light
It’s not over
Hope is rising
Never give in
Never give up
It’s not over…”

(It’s Not Over Yet – For King and Country)

#beatingcowdens