Jeans for Rare Genes 4

As we plan our next fundraiser, we are doing things a little differently.

We are shipping orders for  T-shirts within the US.

The shirt looks like this:

If interested- shirts are $20 plus shipping.

Shipping is $7 for 1 and $13 for 2 (Priority Mail)

Please include shipping costs in your payment, and send a check payable to the PTEN Foundation to: PO Box 140163 Staten Island, NY 10314

Right now I am only shipping in the US.

If you are attending the event- you may pre-order your shirt by letting me know the size you need, and committing to pay with your ticket.  Those attending the event, the T-shirts will be $15.

Looking forward to supporting the PTEN Foundation http://www.ptenfoundation.org

#beatingcowdens

Rare, Invisible, Real – Jeans for Rare Genes 3

We were worried.  Attendance was at an all-time low.  We had picked a bad weekend, but it was too late to change it.

We took the event off “eventbrite” this year, looking to take the fees they collect and get them to the PTEN Foundation.

It took a whole lot of record keeping, but it was worth it.

We had an “Early Bird Special” and free T-shirts.  We opted for a new venue, a deluxe buffet brunch, and beer, wine and sangria for the grown ups.

After months of planning, of soliciting donations, of advertising, Emailing, and distributing flyers, we had exhausted every avenue we knew.

We received so many generous donations that were accompanied by, “I wish I could, but..”

We received so many well-wishes and positive thoughts from genuine people.

But, in the end we were looking at attendance numbers far lower than last year.

We had excellent baskets – Some were gathered by friends and family. Others were given as donations, and many were put together by my loving husband.

Meghan and I wrote out and carefully planned what we wanted to say.

She opted this year to stray from her pattern of creating videos, and she created a Power Point of the year in review instead.

But, as late as that morning the text and phone calls kept coming from people who could not make it.

We walked into the room anxious.  Not sure of how the day would go.

We should not have worried.

What this crowd may have lacked in volume they more than made up for in LOVE, SUPPORT, GENEROSITY, and COMPASSION.

They were from all areas of our lives.  There were family.  There were lots of cousins.  There were friends.  There were colleagues.  There was Meghan’s Physical Therapist, her math teacher, and her former paraprofessional.  There were friends of friends.  There was Charlie Balloons, and a DJ whose services had been paid by some dear friends as a donation.

There were 42 raffle baskets, and a 50/50.  The money generated just from those two things was mind-blowing.

There were 2 schools, PS1 with cousin Kim, and Holy Rosary with our friend Christal, that each raised over $400 at their schools for the cause.

We laughed.  We drank.  We ate.  We talked.  Kids danced with balloon creations.  There were musical chairs and fun.  There was pure love in the room.

When Meghan and I spoke there was silence.  Attention.  Focus.

Cowden’s Syndrome is understood by this crowd, because of us.

And there stood my daughter, telling this crowd of 100+ that she was tired of “Living with Cowden’s Syndrome.”  She “put Cowden’s Syndrome on notice.”  She told it, it was time to “keep up with her.”  She’s got things to do.  Places to go.  People to see.  She’s growing up right before my eyes.

Not long ago she was a scared and confused 8 year old.  Now she is a wise, and mature beyond her years, 13-year-old young woman.  She wants the PTEN Foundation to flourish.  She wants research, a patient database, and even a cure.  She’s 13.  There is time to get it right for her, and all the young ones being diagnosed after her.  She has drive and ambition.

She chose a song to end her speech.  She chose “Let it Go” from Frozen.  She toyed around with a few songs, but this is the one that spoke to her, at this moment.  This one got to her heart.  And you could tell, as she belted it out acapella.


In the end, as people with full bellies, and big smiles, hugged us goodbye, they spoke of “next year.”  They said this one was “the best yet.” We felt loved and full of gratitude.

And as we sorted through the finances, we were struck with something amazing.  Jeans for Rare Genes 3 would be making a cumulative donation of just over $12,000 to the PTEN Foundation.  This love, this event, these people, the generosity of so many, had generated an amazing amount.

Our hearts are full of gratitude.

A donation of over $12,000 to the PTEN Foundation.  Because of you.

Thank you for valuing a cause that matters so much to my family.  Thank you for loving us.  Thank you for supporting us from near and far.  Thank you for your never-ending generosity.  Thank you for your prayers and good wishes.

Because of you we remain #beatingcowdens!

Thank you!

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Inspirational Staten Islander 2016

An inspiration provokes a desire in you to be a better human.  An inspiration can be any age, race, gender or creed.  An inspiration speaks to your soul through their actions, and their behaviors.  Words are always secondary to actions.

A role model may be an inspiration, someone you want to emulate, whether they are family, friend, or famous.  Often we put the word “inspirational” to a sports figure, singer, or movie star, but all too often we are disappointed by those high up in positions of fame and fortune.

Inspirational people, the ones who change lives, tend to be regular people who we interface with often.  Coaches come quickly to mind as inspirational.  Teammates who are there to lift us up and share our shining moments and disappointments come to mind as well.  In some cases teachers can inspire us, by lighting a fire, or a love of learning, or a passion about a topic or a zest for knowledge.

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I am fortunate to know many inspirational people.  Most of them would be confused if I named them.  They are typically the people out in the world doing their jobs, living their lives, and passionately giving their all to whatever task is theirs.

So many of you who read these words on a regular basis, inspire us to remain #beatingcowdens.

Last week I was notified that Meghan was nominated as “Inspirational Staten Islander of 2016.”  This nomination was connected to her selection as “Staten Islander of the Month”  in February 2016.  There was quite a list of remarkable, inspirational, every-day people on that list.  I read the article top to bottom and was truly, inspired.

Inspirational Islander Poll

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But, Meghan is MY inspiration.  She is MY reason, my WHY.  I would not lie and ever say she or I are PERFECT, because no one is.  But we do pretty well together, supporting each other.  And, when I’m about done pushing, one look at her face inspires me to keep on keeping on.

There was a week of voting, by people who clearly felt a particular nominee was the most inspirational.  It was a week of watching the polls as family and friends voted alongside. By Monday she had a significant lead.  We were humbled.  By Tuesday afternoon as we sat in an MRI for her knee in Manhattan, she was behind.  Roller Coaster.  It was hard to react with the knowledge that each nominee indeed was inspirational. And,  winning or losing, would not increase or decrease the value of the other nominees inspirational acts.

Voting was to close at noon Wednesday.  I sat up Tuesday night to vote for MY inspiration, as often as I was allowed.  But, at some point I became very anxious, and I stopped and I prayed.  I asked for guidance as to when it was time to just walk away.  I asked for a clear sign.

At about 2:15 AM on Wednesday the 11th, I received a Facebook Message from Destinee Moe.  This young lady was running the poll right behind Meghan and I just wasn’t sure how it was going to end.  This is a text of the message.

Hello Mrs.Ortega I’m Destinee Moe one of the nominees for Inspirational Islander Of 2016. I just want you and your daughter to know how truly inspiring she is! I could never be as strong as Meghan 😊she going through a lot and still manages to smile! It’s truly an honor to be able to run against someone so strong 🙂 I wouldn’t want anyone else to win this race 💯 she truly inspires me to be a strong young adult ! Best of luck to both of you and hope everything is well with Meghan ❤️ keeping her in my prayers.

And I cried.  Right there in front of my computer screen.  There was the sign I had prayed for.  There was a soul so inspiring she was looking for the good in others she was racing against.  There was a meaningful inspiration.

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I responded to her as best I could.

It’s funny I would catch your message at this hour, as years of parenting a sick little one, have left me able to function on not too much rest. I really appreciate your message, as everything I have read about you indicates you are of the same strength of character as my daughter. It is inspiring to me when young women like the two of you show leadership qualities at such a young age. This whole experience, win or lose, has been an incredible journey for her. Today she learned to balance her morning swim, with an honors schedule, and then a 2 hour MRI for the knee that caused her 6 surgeries and still gives her grief, followed by 2 more hours in traffic, significant homework, and keeping a close eye on the voting in between. This young lady I have is truly my inspiration, as her early diagnosis indeed saved my life. However, each story I read was inspirational and it renews my faith in people, and Staten Island. All the best to you as well. It will be behind us all in just a few hours. I have no doubt yours will be a name of influence to look for in the coming years. Stay true. All the best, Lori

She replied once more and I went to bed soon after.  When I woke the next day, Meghan held onto a lead into the noon cut-off.

By 12:45 there was a congratulatory message from Destinee:

Congratulations ❤️ I really hope this pushes her even more to be the strong Inspiring young lady she is. Have a bless day , Destinee

Meghan won the popular vote as “Inspirational Staten Islander of 2016,” and we all got a clearer sense that inspiration is all around us, sometimes coming out from the most unlikely places.

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After all she endures on a regular basis, my Meghan’s one goal was to further awareness of Rare and Genetic Diseases, while getting the word out for her upcoming fundraiser.  Multi-tasking is necessary to follow her schedule.

2017 Event Flyer
2017 Event Flyer

Meghan remains humbled by the gravity of the congratulatory messages coming her way.  Just as she was touched deeply by the message from the nominee closest to her in the polls.

There are so many life lessons, so many inspirational people, so many teachable moments – if only we look.

Meghan attained the title of “Inspirational Staten Islander 2016” and she will use it as best she can to raise awareness of Cowden’s Syndrome, PTEN Mutations and other Rare Diseases.  She will also walk away with a few valuable life lessons.

We remain

#BeatingCowdens!

Click HERE to read the ARTICLE! (It’s a really good article! 😉 )

 

 

 

“BE the Change You Wish to See in the World” – Ghandi

be the change

With another fall season upon us, life is in full blown crazy mode.  And, to be honest, we wouldn’t have it any other way.

Yesterday, my 12 year old FINALLY throughly enjoyed a Halloween.  It was such a thrill to watch.  FINALLY, she was able to trick or treat, EAT a few treats, AND keep up with some serious walking with friends.

Of course, she slept until almost 1 pm, even with the time change, and woke up unable to move her AVM knee.  These are the repurcussions we expect.  She is not “normal,”  but when she can pretend for a while when it really counts… well that is a great success.  And even as she lay still most of the day, she smiled.  She sang.  Joy.

Fall is full of things, and so far she’s managing nicely.  With a marking period to end Friday, Pupil Path tells me grades are at an all time high.  Practice 4 times a week has her swim times at an all time low.  And, drama twice a week is leaving hopeful anticipation as “The Wizard of Oz” is soon to be cast.

She is working with me to plan our second fund raiser in February.  We chose a date close to World Rare Disease Day, with the continued desire, and intention to bring awareness to our rare disease, and over 7,000 rare diseases worldwide that affect 10% of the world’s population.  We are acutely aware that to be heard, we need to join collective voices.  Individually we matter little to most of the healthcare system, overwhelmed, uneqipped to diagnose and treat us.  Together is the only way we have a chance.

Last year we raised over $12,000 and donated it to the PTEN Foundation (www.PTENfoundation.org) and the Global Genes Project (www.GlobalGenes.org).  This year we hope to exceed $20,000 in donations.

We have brought in Bob Jackson, a performer from Walt Disney World.  He will be flying up to entertain our guests.  Our whole family LOVES Bob, but Meghan especially will not hear of celebrating a birthday until Bob sings to her.  We’ve spent her last 8 birthdays at Disney.

Here is a youtube video that is a great indicator of the FUN time Bob brings!

We have lined up sound with Partners in Sound, and we have Balloon Charlie returning to also help entertain the children.

We have established a children’s menu in hopes that families can enjoy the afternoon out together.

There will be raffles and lots of laughing.

There will be comfortable JEANS and good friends.

We are setting up a facebook group called Jeans for Rare Genes 2016 Staten Island, and we encourage you to join.

We have tickets to the event available through Jeans For Rare Genes 2 – Tickets and Donations link

Meghan is living life as a 12 year old who just happens to have had 15 surgeries.  She is a 12 year old who just happens to have a Rare Disease.  She is a 12 year old who realizes that as challenging as life is, so many others suffer worse.  She is my hero.  She is MY role model.

Together we will make Jeans for Rare Genes a thrilling success.  Hope to see you there!

Time with
Time with “BOB” our favorite entertainer…

Kid of Achievement!

Today I turned 41.  And while I am incredibly grateful for the gift of life, and for “More Birthdays,” as the American Cancer Society once put it, my birthday holds all sorts of emotional challenges for me.

I have a memory for dates.  And seasons.  And events.  And people.  Especially people I love a lot.  And 23 years ago on this November day, my beautiful 6 year old cousin Meghan was invited to dance with the angels.  Childhood Leukemia weakened her body so, that she was not to stay here physically.  Yet on my 18th birthday I got the gift of the most spectacular guardian angel – and her name and her spirit live on in my girl.  Even with all the good, the day messes with me.  I tried explaining it to my Meghan last night, and the best I could give her was – 23 years become 23 days sometimes.  The pain just gets a whole lot more fresh.

And Grandma, Dad’s Mom got her wings just a few weeks ago.  After 88 years and a life well-lived, it was still tough to see her go.  Not even a year since Dad…

And last November 12th, on my 40th, my Dad was in the middle of what was to be the fight of his life.  We spent it together.  An unsavory appointment, and some legal crap I wish never had to be.

And this year a dear, compassionate, kind-hearted, fun-loving relative sits, so close to the end of his life here on earth.  My heart just gets full.

So, it came as a pleasant surprise last week when my cell phone rang and it was Gina from the Staten Island Children’s Museum, telling me that Meghan had been selected as one of this year’s “Kid of Achievement” honorees, for her advocacy work in the community.  The luncheon was to be held on November 12th.

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“Of course we’ll be there.”  And I couldn’t wait to share the news with her.

We kept kind of quiet while she prepared her speech, and I sent her to school this morning with her backpack and her speech and a pretty dress.  Quite a swap from her typical sweats.

We arrived at the Hilton Garden at 11:15, sized up the room that we will be in for our fundraiser on February 15, 2015, and checked out the raffles.  We met the other honoree, a lovely young woman being honored for her work with Project Homefront.  The tables filled in and the event began.

When Meghan was introduced for this award, her advocacy was the focus.  Her nominee(s) knew her history.  They knew of her work, and her goals.

She delivered this speech with incredible poise.

When my mom got the call that I received this award, I was thrilled.  All of my advocacy began with me wanting to make a difference.  I am so honored, and humbled to realize that I am.

I was diagnosed in 2011 with a rare genetic disorder called Cowden’s Syndrome.  It affects 1 in 200,000 people and it starts from a broken PTEN gene.  The PTEN gene is the tumor suppressor.  The PTEN gene prevents benign and cancerous tumors, but since mine is broken I have a higher chance of getting these things. 

My Mom was diagnosed weeks after me.  A few months after that she was diagnosed with early stage breast cancer.  She had some pink ribbons around the house, and she got a pink ribbon Pandora necklace.

I knew about the gold ribbon for childhood cancer, and the puzzle piece for autism.  I knew there were many others, and that all these disorders had a symbol, and with a symbol comes a voice.  I had many medical issues, and went to the doctor all the time.  I knew there had to be symbol for people/kids like me; kids who’ve had eleven surgeries in eleven years, kids who’ve had countless tests and are treated like human pincushions.  Imagine, all this happens to prevent cancer.  There is no simple solution, only a constant set of routine poking, prodding, tests, surgeries and more!

We kept looking for a symbol.  We found one when we came across the Global Genes Project.  They stand for all rare and genetic disorders, their symbol is the denim ribbon, and their slogan is “Hope, it’s in our genes.”  But, there was not a necklace, no jewelry.  There was nothing to wear to help me show people, and tell the world about genetic disorders.

I asked my parents if we could get something made, and we did.  My parents found a compassionate and caring jeweler who created the mold for the necklace I am wearing today.  We reached out to the Global Genes Project again and again, in hopes they would sell the necklace too. Recently, they put a similar necklace on their market, and I can’t wait for it to become as popular as some of the popular pieces I have come to know.

Rare and genetic diseases are out there.  Most are very rare, but there are over 7,000 of them.  More work needs to be done individually and collectively, to get them the funding they need

In 2013, just about 18 months after our diagnoses, we celebrated “Rare Disease Day” which is February 29th – the rarest day- or February 28th on non-leap years, by handing out denim ribbons at our schools.  We had assemblies, and I got to talk to my peers about what it was like to live with a rare disease every day.

I have had 4 knee surgeries for a vascular malformation in my right knee.  I have a good deal of pain in my body, there, and pretty much all over.  Some days I feel great, and other days I can’t get too far.  One day in the spring of 2013, my mom was pushing me in a wheelchair to an appointment.  I was annoyed by the number of people staring at me and talking about me.  I heard things like, “lazy,” and “she’s not sick.”  I decided I could be angry, or I could do something.  While I definitely spent some time through the years being angry at some of the things – like running- that Cowden’s had taken from me, I decided instead I was going to DO something.

That night my Dad helped me design a business card that very briefly explains Cowden’s Syndrome.  I have handed out hundreds to those who stare, and to those who just care.  I like to spread the word, one card at a time.

This card was created out of her need to "teach" others about Cowden's Syndrome.
This card was created out of her need to “teach” others about Cowden’s Syndrome.

This year, right before Rare Disease Day in February, I had my thyroid removed.  Thyroid cancer is very common in young people with Cowden’s Syndrome.  My thyroid had been watched since my diagnosis, and it went from having 4 nodules in 2011 to 16 nodules and 3 precancerous tumors in 2014.  I was fortunate, but the surgery was rotten, and it has been hard getting the medicine quite right.  I have been called a “Previvor,” which is someone who has an organ removed before the genetic cancer that is looming has a chance to strike.

This kid is clearly a "FORCE" to be reckoned with!
This kid is clearly a “FORCE” to be reckoned with!

This year, for Rare Disease Day, I decided to raise some money.  We sold T-Shirts at my school and we had a fundraiser.  The money all went to the Global Genes Project, and it felt really good.

At my old school, in February, I also met the Borough President.  He took such an interest in my story, he made me feel awesome.  I have visited Borough Hall a few times, and love talking with him.  He has encouraged me to keep dreaming bigger and I will.

Two weeks ago my Mom and I signed a contract with the Hilton for a fund raising breakfast on February 15, 2015.  We will be raising money for the Global Genes Project, and the PTEN foundation.  The PTEN foundation is a new organization, working just for PTEN disorders like Cowden’s Syndrome.   We hope to have raffles, and T shirts for sale.  We plan to have music and fin.

We set up ticket sales through eventbrite, and we called it “Beating Cowden’s First Annual Jeans for Rare Jeans Fundraiser.”  Sales are open to anyone who wants to come support two great causes.

I am on a mission to spread awareness and raise funds for diseases people know too little about.  I will not be satisfied until each of them has the recognition they need, and the cure they deserve.

Thank you again for this award, and for encouraging me to continue my mission.

Here is a video of her speech.

And when she was met with a standing ovation there were tears in my eyes.  Tears of pride.

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One after another people approached her, and complimented her.

Not a single one would have known the strength it took for her to walk in the room today.  The pain was unbearable.  But she did it.  With grace and a smile.

And in addition to the compliments, there were offers to help.  Real, genuine offers.

We will Email some of our new friends tonight.  And with their help, in February we will blow this fund raiser out of the water.

Kid of Achievement indeed.

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World, you haven’t seen anything yet!

Here’s the link to our local paper….

http://www.silive.com/westshore/index.ssf/2014/11/staten_island_childrens_museum.html#incart_river

 

And while you’re at it – book your tickets for February 15th!

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/beating-cowdens-first-annual-jeans-for-rare-genes-fundraiser-tickets-14130024283

 

Competence, Compassion and Dedication? All at once!

Yesterday afternoon began very typical of so many of our days.  I left work, got Meghan at school, and instead of heading home we headed to 60th and 5th for a doctor’s appointment.

Trip to Manhattan, not a problem.  Trip IN Manhattan – super high stress.

breathe stone

Felix met us and I was able to let Meghan out of the car to endure the extra 20 minutes needed to get around the block to the parking garage I had printed a coupon for.  Silly as it may sound, that advanced planing has saved me hundreds of dollars – as our bill yesterday alone was a meager $35 for the lot as compared to the $63 it could have been.

Inside we filled out tons of paperwork, Meghan and I as new patients, and Felix in for his one year follow up.  It was the first time we’ve actually had an appointment as a family.

Last year we ended up with this doctor for Felix after a skin biopsy went bad locally.  It took weeks for me to obtain less than favorable results, news of unclear margins, and the potential wait of several weeks for a repeat excision.  I promptly transferred the biopsy slides and all information to a cancer specialty center in Manhattan and we met our doctor.  She had the slides reviewed and told Felix that not one, but BOTH sites biopsied needed further attention.  She took them to clean margins and ultimately diagnosed him with “Dysplastic Nevus Syndrome.”  He had been fortunate.  Precancerous lesions cleanly removed.  Annual screening from then until forever.

This year Felix squirmed a bit when I talked about his follow up, but I knew if we could all be connected to this doctor it would be a win all around.  Little did I know the scope of the score it would be.

Meghan, now with not only Cowden’s to raise her skin cancer risk, but also the genetic “dysplastic nevus syndrome”  potentially inherited from her father, needed a dermatologist in place for annual screenings – ASAP.  And for me, well, it was something I had been doing, but not with someone too good.  Time to ratchet it up a notch.

The doctor was amazing.

She immediately made Meghan feel comfortable and valuable, and spoke with her at length about the presentation of Cowden’s Syndrome she had experienced.  My daughter is incredibly empowered about her own health and held a 10 minute conversation quite nicely.  While I filled in a few gaps, the doctor told us she had worked previously at the NIH, (National Institute of Health,) and the NCI (National Cancer Institute) and was therefore, aware of Cowden’s Syndrome.  That alone is a rarity in our world.

But she took it much farther than that.  She wanted to know about the disease presentation in me as well.  She wanted to know how much had gone on before and after diagnosis, and how difficult of a path we had traveled to try and find knowledgeable doctors.  She was in constant thought, wondering about what she could do.  She spoke almost immediately about training her peers to be the front lines in screening for Cowden’s Syndrome, and how if they could identify classic marks like the trichilemmoma she removed from my forearm, they might be able to raise flags early and help save lives.

Harmless enough, common in Cowden's Syndrome, she wanted one confirmed though biopsy.
Harmless enough, common in Cowden’s Syndrome, she wanted one confirmed though biopsy.
Healing... less than 24 hours later.
Healing… less than 24 hours later.

She wanted to know what we had in terms of screening, and records.  What could I send her?  CDs?  Images?  PDF?  How fast?  She could have my CT scan reread for no fee.  Just send everything.  (Of course everything is in about 6 inches of binders.  So there is sorting and scanning to be done.

What is this http://www.PTENfoundation.org ? She wanted to know.  Can she refer people there?  What if she publishes in a dermatology journal?  Could she list the foundation?

My head was literally spinning – but in a good way for once.

I am going to present on you she said, both of you.  But no one has to know its you.

And finally a doctor who ALSO feels this way!
And finally a doctor who ALSO feels this way!

“Can I come?” asks my curious 11 year old.

“Of course…”

And as she took such a liking to Meghan she asked me who was managing her care.  When I said, “me.”  She was visibly bothered for me.

Someone should be looking after her.  Let’s think about what she needs.  And with that she rattled off doctors to handle things I couldn’t get my local doctors to address with a ten foot pole.   She told me I’d hear from her this week, and from some other doctors too.

I left with three negative exams, 6 months for me and Meghan, and a year for Felix.  I left with my belly hungry and my head racing.

Was I dreaming?  Had I really finally found the doctor to help us?

No one should have to travel your path alone, she said.  You need help navigating.

From her lips to God’s ears.  May she be true to her word.

In the mean time I have quite the homework assignment.

So as I sit with my “eventbrite” window open, excitedly hearing the “dings” of attention out February Fundraiser is generating – I am going to get started on perhaps the most important homework of our live

Two of a Kind

The upside of waiting I guess, is that it gives me a bit of time.  Since I can’t concentrate, I multitask.  Simultaneously taking down the Christmas decorations, while doing laundry and eating chocolate chip cookies with white wine.  Seems like a perfect time to stop and blog.

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A few months back I posted about Meghan‘s necklace.  The one that we had had created, just for her, inspired by the Global Genes Project logo of the denim jeans.  She received it in August and was so thrilled.  She wears it proudly and looks at it as a platform to explain to people what it stands for.

Meg necklace

Her goal in having it created was to ultimately have the Global Genes Project sell them as a fund raiser.  She has this hope that her idea will ultimately raise money for rare and genetic disorders.  I think she is right, and eventually they will get to selling it.  Although the holidays are a crazy time and a lot of major things have been going on at the Global Genes Project.  They are a super organization.  Working to the benefit of all of us who are affected by rare genetic disorders – in our case, Cowden’s Syndrome.

This fall she had my friend’s husband – who created the piece, engrave hers.  It says “August 2012 – First of its kind.”  How appropriate.  I am quite sure my girl is the “first of her kind” as well.

Because, she decided she wanted me to have one too.  A necklace like hers.

necklace 1

“After all Mom, you didn’t just have breast cancer.  Cowden’s Syndrome is what we will both have – forever.”

She’s right.  As I gulp the last of my wine.  We are at this forever.  Together.  And as much as it flat out stinks, I wouldn’t want to share forever with anyone else.  She is one awesome little girl.  Each of us 1 in 200,000.  Lucky enough to have each other.

Two of a kind
Two of a kind