Rare Lives, Rare Disease Day, and So Much More to Come

Thursday, February 28th, 2019 is World Rare Disease Day.

There was a point close to forever ago when that meant nothing to me.  I had never even heard of it.

Our initial Cowden’s Syndrome diagnoses came in the fall of 2011.  Meghan got her’s first, and mine followed soon after.  2012 held the most insane whirlwind of medical and surgical experiences we have ever known.

By the time Rare Disease Day came around in 2013, we had begun to feel the need to raise awareness of our PTEN Mutation causing Cowden’s Syndrome.  Even though we were grateful to have each other, to be 1 in 200,000 can be isolating.

At the time my girl took to the Global Genes Project and learned all she could about rare diseases.  She was most struck by the reality that many children diagnosed with rare diseases don’t live to see their 5th birthday.  She promised she would always try to speak, not only for herself, but also for the “littles” who couldn’t tell their story.

Meghan’s Speech in 4th Grade…

The text of her speech – Meghan Speaks Out!

In 2013 she spoke at her school and at mine.  We handed out denim ribbons, and started opening eyes.

In 2014 we stood together, as she was a student at my elementary school.  She created a video, we did a fundraiser.  There was something empowering about sharing knowledge.

February 2013 Article

In 2014 she met Borough President Oddo and they are still in contact.  He has been a mentor for her through the years.

RDD Blog Through Meghan’s Eyes 2014

Rare Diseases as a whole are common.  One in ten people suffers with a rare disease.  Yet, there are over 7,000 rare diseases and each carries with it it’s own specific challenges.  More than 350 MILLION people suffer from a rare disease, yet it takes 8 years on average for a diagnosis.  https://globalgenes.org/rare-facts/ In the interim, so many people trudge through the day to day challenges alone.  Typically there is no one to relate to their experiences, and even the best intended friends and relatives often tire of the chronic nature of a disease that won’t ever leave.

Raising awareness became a mission of Meghan’s to help people become more compassionate and kinder towards each other.  We have always worked with the understanding that “everyone has something,” and the more we learn empathy and compassion, the further we will get.

Meghan’s early days of speaking in schools, and creating awareness videos evolved into “Jeans for Rare Genes” a fundraiser involving friends, family, and the community.  There have been 4 so far, each one different than the ones before, but all helping to raise funds and awareness for rare diseases.

In December 2013 the PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndrome Foundation was born, through the blood, sweat and tears of Kristin Anthony, and with a village, it is growing into a helpful, guiding light in our community.  And, finally Meghan has found the focal point for the fundraising!

(check out some of the links below for some of our journeys)

RDD Meghan’s Video 2015

Twelve Surgeries in Eleven Years Article 2015

RDD Meghan’s Speech and Video 2016

Understanding Cowden’s Syndrome Article

Through the years my girl has been honored as a New York State Woman of Distinction, the youngest ever, in 2016.

She was awarded the “Humanitarian Award” at the Teddy Atlas Dinner in November of 2018.  She has racked up close to 20 surgeries in her young life, and yet she has managed to remain a scholar and an athlete.

Lives now forever intertwined. Kristin Anthony celebrates Meghan’s honor with us.

Celebrating Rare Disease Day is sometimes like going to the worst party ever.  Or, maybe it’s the best.  I guess it depends on how you look at it.  We’re here… stronger.  The community is growing.  Support exists.  Hope exists.

Last summer we were contacted by Aldo Soligno on behalf of the “Rare Lives Project.”  He had worked on this project in Europe and had had much success raising awareness to the government about the lives of people with rare diseases.  We were touched to be asked to be part of his American pilot of this project.  And, while it has not received the funding he had hoped, the release of this summer’s photos on social media has been therapeutic for both of us.

Here are some of the picture released to date.  Photo credit Aldo Soligno.

Please follow “Rare Lives” on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter to help them raise awareness of all rare diseases.

Please follow the PTEN Foundation

on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.  Follow their community work, their fundraising, and their efforts to unify with PATIENT FIRST.

This neat initiative is taking place right now, among others!

https://www.facebook.com/ptenrocks/?sfnsw=cl

We are perched in exciting times.  It is a time to reflect, to gather strength and resolve and press forward.

This year I know more people with Cowden’s Syndrome, and more people with other rare diseases.  We are allies and advocates.  We are parents, sisters, brothers and friends.

This year I hold close in my heart a friend’s little one, waiting on her diagnosis.  My heart feels their anguish.  My faith tells me their help will come.

There are still struggles.  Plenty.  But, before telling those stories it was time to remember from where we came.

One thing will not, and has not changed.  We remain forever

#beatingcowdens

Jeans for Rare Genes 4

As we plan our next fundraiser, we are doing things a little differently.

We are shipping orders for  T-shirts within the US.

The shirt looks like this:

If interested- shirts are $20 plus shipping.

Shipping is $7 for 1 and $13 for 2 (Priority Mail)

Please include shipping costs in your payment, and send a check payable to the PTEN Foundation to: PO Box 140163 Staten Island, NY 10314

Right now I am only shipping in the US.

If you are attending the event- you may pre-order your shirt by letting me know the size you need, and committing to pay with your ticket.  Those attending the event, the T-shirts will be $15.

Looking forward to supporting the PTEN Foundation http://www.ptenfoundation.org

#beatingcowdens

Richmond County Savings Foundation

If you were with us at “Jeans for Rare Genes” you heard me announce we had received a grant for $2500 from the Richmond County Savings Foundation.

This story Inspirational Staten Islander to host Fund Raiser ran on February 4th.  On February 8th I was contacted by the Richmond County Savings Foundation.  The story had been read, and it was suggested we apply for a grant on behalf of the PTEN Foundation.

We are relatively new to the fundraising thing, but with a lot of help, we got on track and completed the application.  The PTEN Foundation President, Kristen, spoke with them to get the 501c3 papers squared away.   And – about 10 days later we were notified of a $2500 grant, awarded to the PTEN Foundation!

We included the grant money in all our fundraising totals for the event, but today we got to go to the office to receive the check.  We got to meet Mr. Cesar Claro, who noticed Meghan’s story.  We got to meet Ms. DeSapio who helped us so much via phone and Email.

Meghan took the day off from school, because my speaking time is so limited, and because she’s the reason all this happens anyway.  It was just right for her to be there.

We gathered in a conference room with about 10 incredibly inspirational people.  I loved how professional, yet casual the whole experience was.  Amounts of grants were not discussed.  Checks were distributed in sealed envelopes, but first , everyone spoke about why they were there and how the grant was going to help.

Meghan spoke a little about Cowden’s Syndrome, and how we are hoping the PTEN Foundation will be able to inspire research on our disorder.  She did great, as usual.

We got to hear from a teacher, and his school’s work with Habitat for Humanity.  We heard from “Metropolitan Fire” and how the grant would help their organization.

We got to meet Dennis McKeon From Where To Turn, and hear about the work his organization does on Staten Island.

We heard about the Moravian Church garden and their donations of food.

We met E. Randolph Wheagar from 2nd Chance Youth Empowerment Program, and we were inspired by their community work as well.

We met Jennifer Dudley from Staten Island Children’s Museum and learned about their efforts to “spruce up” the museum.

We met a few other incredible folks as well, one whose organization was obtaining deeds to local neglected cemeteries so they could be maintained.  In the absence of pen and paper a few are slipping my mind, but it was a fantastic experience.  It was an intense 45 minutes!

Perhaps the one that touched our hearts most was Mr. Capolongo who spoke of his son Michael with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.  If you are not familiar with the genetic disorder, you can get some information here. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy  It is a genetic disorder affecting about 1 in 3,500 boys.  The body lack dystrophin, and without it muscle cells become damaged and weaken.  It is progressive.  Michael is 11.  They have 2 other healthy children.  They are a family like ours.  Dad is a policeman, mom is a nurse and a breast cancer survivor. Yet, they have managed to create a not for profit, Michael’s Cause and have raised a million dollars to help fund research, and hopefully, ultimately a cure.

In the 30 minutes we sat across a table I felt inspired, and connected.  I respect so much the positive outlook, and the awareness that even in strife, others have it worse.  I respected the acknowledgement that every day is a gift, and life can change your perspective quickly.  These are things we identify with in this house.  Those are principles we live by.

Meghan and I often feel a little more “at home” in the presence of others with rare disease.  While they are all so drastically different, the difficulty, the fear, the unknown, the isolation, they all overlap.  And what also overlaps are your decisions in how to handle them.

I was reminded of my own girl, at the age of nine telling NY1 that. “You have a choice, you can get angry or you can DO something.”  And, “I feel like I was put here to DO something.”  Watch this clip and reminisce with me.

Today we were full of gratitude.  Today we were inspired by others.  Today we were reminded of our own mission.  Today was a continuation of an ongoing goal,  and a reminder that it matters.  It all matters.

We remain

#beatingcowdens

Rare, Invisible, Real – Jeans for Rare Genes 3

We were worried.  Attendance was at an all-time low.  We had picked a bad weekend, but it was too late to change it.

We took the event off “eventbrite” this year, looking to take the fees they collect and get them to the PTEN Foundation.

It took a whole lot of record keeping, but it was worth it.

We had an “Early Bird Special” and free T-shirts.  We opted for a new venue, a deluxe buffet brunch, and beer, wine and sangria for the grown ups.

After months of planning, of soliciting donations, of advertising, Emailing, and distributing flyers, we had exhausted every avenue we knew.

We received so many generous donations that were accompanied by, “I wish I could, but..”

We received so many well-wishes and positive thoughts from genuine people.

But, in the end we were looking at attendance numbers far lower than last year.

We had excellent baskets – Some were gathered by friends and family. Others were given as donations, and many were put together by my loving husband.

Meghan and I wrote out and carefully planned what we wanted to say.

She opted this year to stray from her pattern of creating videos, and she created a Power Point of the year in review instead.

But, as late as that morning the text and phone calls kept coming from people who could not make it.

We walked into the room anxious.  Not sure of how the day would go.

We should not have worried.

What this crowd may have lacked in volume they more than made up for in LOVE, SUPPORT, GENEROSITY, and COMPASSION.

They were from all areas of our lives.  There were family.  There were lots of cousins.  There were friends.  There were colleagues.  There was Meghan’s Physical Therapist, her math teacher, and her former paraprofessional.  There were friends of friends.  There was Charlie Balloons, and a DJ whose services had been paid by some dear friends as a donation.

There were 42 raffle baskets, and a 50/50.  The money generated just from those two things was mind-blowing.

There were 2 schools, PS1 with cousin Kim, and Holy Rosary with our friend Christal, that each raised over $400 at their schools for the cause.

We laughed.  We drank.  We ate.  We talked.  Kids danced with balloon creations.  There were musical chairs and fun.  There was pure love in the room.

When Meghan and I spoke there was silence.  Attention.  Focus.

Cowden’s Syndrome is understood by this crowd, because of us.

And there stood my daughter, telling this crowd of 100+ that she was tired of “Living with Cowden’s Syndrome.”  She “put Cowden’s Syndrome on notice.”  She told it, it was time to “keep up with her.”  She’s got things to do.  Places to go.  People to see.  She’s growing up right before my eyes.

Not long ago she was a scared and confused 8 year old.  Now she is a wise, and mature beyond her years, 13-year-old young woman.  She wants the PTEN Foundation to flourish.  She wants research, a patient database, and even a cure.  She’s 13.  There is time to get it right for her, and all the young ones being diagnosed after her.  She has drive and ambition.

She chose a song to end her speech.  She chose “Let it Go” from Frozen.  She toyed around with a few songs, but this is the one that spoke to her, at this moment.  This one got to her heart.  And you could tell, as she belted it out acapella.


In the end, as people with full bellies, and big smiles, hugged us goodbye, they spoke of “next year.”  They said this one was “the best yet.” We felt loved and full of gratitude.

And as we sorted through the finances, we were struck with something amazing.  Jeans for Rare Genes 3 would be making a cumulative donation of just over $12,000 to the PTEN Foundation.  This love, this event, these people, the generosity of so many, had generated an amazing amount.

Our hearts are full of gratitude.

A donation of over $12,000 to the PTEN Foundation.  Because of you.

Thank you for valuing a cause that matters so much to my family.  Thank you for loving us.  Thank you for supporting us from near and far.  Thank you for your never-ending generosity.  Thank you for your prayers and good wishes.

Because of you we remain #beatingcowdens!

Thank you!

qimg_9308img_9325img_9323img_9312img_9309img_9303-1img_9336img_9337img_9338img_9339img_9340img_9341img_9342-1

Onward…

“Onward Christian Soldiers, marching as to war, with the cross of Jesus going on before…”  That was one of Pop’s favorite hymns growing up in our Lutheran Church.  He sang it loud.  He lived it softly, but meaningfully…

It’s been a long time since I have written and I am sorry.

Writing is my therapy.  It’s free and easy.  When there is a few minutes to do it.

writing

And that, well that has been the problem these last few weeks.

I know it’s hard to imagine life getting so crazy that I wouldn’t have an hour or two a week to get my thoughts together, but it’s true.

Time to catch you all up –

On Sunday, February 21, 2016 the Second Annual “Genes for Rare Genes” fundraiser took place at the Hilton Garden Inn on Staten Island.  We had www.yeehahbob.com  Bob Jackson from Walt Disney World at the piano entertaining the masses.  We had generously donated raffles galore.  We had 178 friends and family with us, raising money and awareness for Rare Diseases.  We had Meghan, hosting, and giving her speech and showing her video.  https://beatingcowdens.com/2016/02/21/meghans-rare-disease-day-video-and-speech-2016/  We had Borough President Oddo stop by to continue to support Meghan in her desire to raise awareness and funds.  We had Charlie Balloons entertaining the children and the adults too.

My Everything
My Everything

 

Bob Jackson - Our Disney Friend
Bob Jackson – Our Disney Friend

It was a perfect day, and a month later I can tell you the total funds raised were $13,045.40 to be exact!  A large portion of that money has been sent to the PTEN Foundation and will have a significant impact on helping people like us with PTEN Mutations.  The balance of the money is soon to be on it’s way to the Global Genes Project They will always be near and dear to Meghan.  We identified first with the denim ribbon, and the logo “Hope, It’s in our Genes.”  And that is the site we learned first about Rare Diseases, and that we in fact are among the lucky ones.  These are lessons we will never forget.

Meghan addressing a crowded room
Meghan addressing a crowded room

 

Just a handful of our many raffles
Just a handful of our many raffles

Finally, I THINK, (and I apologize if we forgot anyone) all the thank you notes have been written or Emailed.  When I finally settled down to do it, there were over 80.  Meg helped, but I just flat out write faster.  Now, we rest on that a bit, while we consider what changes and what remains the same for next year.

But, life did not even pause while we planned this event.  My grandfather, my 96 year old grandfather, who was still living on the second floor of the two family home my mother grew up in, caring for my grandma, his bride of 70 years, fell on January 13th.  This set of a tirade of events of the next few weeks that brought us all through an emotional roller coaster.  My grandparents were the center of my world for much of my life, and even though I am blessed to have had them for 42 years, it is hard to imagine navigating life without them.   Pop visited two hospitals, had mutliple strokes, and ultimately ended up in the nursing home for rehabilitation.  The rehab was not meant to be, and on March 3rd he passed away peacefully, after some tumultuous days.

Pop - So much to so many
Pop – So much to so many

Grandma, now resides in that same nursing home.  Alzheimer’s has robbed her of much of her memory, but she is well cared for by kind, patient people.  She is safe.  She is calmer.  This is a good thing.  And, in one of many ironies, perhaps her disease has been a blessing.  There was no need for her to say goodbye to Pop, as he always seems to be just “across the room” when we visit.  They were never meant to be apart any way.

Always together...
Always together…

We celebrated Pop’s life at a beautiful service on March 12th.  My conscious mind, the rational one, is grateful he is at peace, and thrilled to know he is Home in Heaven.  The little girl in me, the one who adores her grandfather is sad.  Just very sad, and not looking forward to the series of “firsts” in front of us as reality sets in.

I planted the seedlings for my garden, just as my Pop showed me.  I am tending to them on the kitchen table with plenty of sunlight.  They have begun to sprout.

image

And those seedlings, and signs of new life remind me of why Pop loved the garden so.  It is refreshing to see growth, new life, and new promise each day.

We celebrated Kathi’s bridal shower, as she and Jon will marry April 15th.  All things new.

Time keeps passing.

time passes

In the interim there have been regular Mommy things to do, like swim practice, and doctor’s appointments, and household stuff.  Thankfully in this house we have a very, very helpful Daddy, and we do a lot of team work.  Thanks to him, all those weeks I was out of commission cherishing every moment with Pop, he was here, keeping it all going.

Last week we went dress shopping for some of the events coming quickly.

This week it was shoe shopping.  Shopping for shoes is never as much fun, because it is hard to find a shoe that is 12 years old, and supports those feet, knees and legs.  The right knee, the site of 6 surgeries targeting that AVM, has residual damage.  The muscles are not formed as well, obvious only to Meghan when she puts on a pair of jeans.  The foot is over one full size smaller than the other, and it is skinnier too.  So, we buy two pairs of shoes to make one “pair.”  We are careful.  Frugal when we can be as it’s all x2, but focus is always on fit, style and comfort combined.  No easy task.  But, we did it.

Meghan left the store apologizing for the bill.  I told her how grateful I am that we can pay for shoes, and other things.  We had a long talk about the phrase, “I cried because I had no shoes, then I met a man who had no feet.”  It fits nicely with the perspective talks we have all the time.

image

Tonight I was thrilled to find a website that will allow me to donate her “other” shoes to amputees.  She was excited too.  Something that will make us both feel better.

This week I scheduled some more appointments.  I was waiting.

Friday we head to the gyn for the 3 month follow up.  The hormones are a nightmare, but that’s for another post.  The next biopsy is supposed to be in June…

The dermatologist 6 month will be during spring break.  So will the orthopedist.

Cowden’s wasn’t gone.  Heck, it wasn’t even resting.  I was just using a big stick to hold it at bay for a few weeks.  I’m sure I left some stuff out.  It’ll come up if it was all that important.  Just know-

We are still #BEATINGCOWDENS!

Onward…

 

Meghan’s Rare Disease Day Video and Speech 2016

This is the text of the speech Meghan delivered at this year’s “Jean’s for Rare Genes 2” Fundraiser.  Regardless of the monetary totals, which will come in the next days to weeks, I can assure you it was a success.

I want to start by thanking you for attending this fundraiser here today.  This is the second “Jeans for Rare Genes, a tradition I hope continues to grow each year.

I knew nothing at all about Rare Diseases until the fall of 2011.  I was in 3rd grade.  I went to a geneticist because I was having all sorts of medical trouble.  He diagnosed me with Cowden’s Syndrome.  A few weeks later he diagnosed my mom with the same thing.

Cowden’s Syndrome is a mutation (a break or a mistake) on the PTEN gene which is a gene that is supposed to keep the body from making tumors.  Basically, when you have Cowden’s Syndrome, which is pretty rare (only 1 in 200,000 people) your body makes tumors.  Sometimes they are benign, and sometimes they are cancer.  It also causes my body to make vascular malformations, like the one in my right knee, that has caused me 6 surgeries all by itself.  That is why with Cowden’s Syndrome we have to be watched all the time.  There are so many doctors, so many things that need to be checked, and scanned and looked at, it can be really overwhelming.

You can’t catch Cowden’s Syndrome, it has to be inherited, like I got it from my Mom.  You also can’t get rid of it.  Once you have it, the only thing you can do is get checked, a lot.

I have had 16 surgeries so far, and I only turned 12 in August.  That doesn’t even count for the doctor’s appointments, Emergency Room visits, scans, and never-ending blood tests.

When I first learned I had Cowden’s Syndrome, I went to a website called the Global Genes Project to learn of facts about rare diseases.  I learned all sorts of interesting, and sometimes upsetting facts.

  • There are approximately7,000 different types of rare diseases and disorders, with more being discovered each day
  • 30 million people in the United States are living with rare diseases. This equates to 1 in 10 Americans or 10% of the S. population
  • 80% of rare diseases are genetic in origin
  • Approximately 50% of the people affected by rare diseases are children
  • 30% of children with rare disease will not live to see their 5th birthday
  • 95% of rare diseases have not one single FDA approved drug treatment
  • Approximately 50% of rare diseases do not have a disease specific foundation supporting or researching their rare disease

I started out feeling like I didn’t fit in anywhere.  I couldn’t understand why all these diseases existed and no one seemed to know or care.  I found the “Global Genes Project” motto, “Hope it’s in our Genes” to be a comforting play on words.  I identified myself with the denim ribbon, a powerful symbol of Rare Genetic Disorders.  My Mom’s friend made me a denim ribbon necklace, and I felt like I had an identity piece, something that represented me.

At first I organized an assembly at my school, and in 4th grade we gave out denim ribbons to raise awareness.  In 5th grade we had a fundraiser. We sold some T-shirts, and had a small event at the school.  The money went to the Global Genes Project.

Last year, a charity was created called the PTEN Foundation.  It is the first charity that looks to help people with our specific disease.  They want to create a patient database, so people with our Syndrome can be studied and learned about.  Then, maybe there will be a way to help us. 

As happy as I was about the PTEN Foundation, by this time, I had learned about a lot of other Rare Diseases, and kids, who didn’t have a chance to live and do as much as I can.  I promised myself I would always remember those kids when I did any fundraisers.

Last February, “Jeans for Rare Genes” happened at the Hilton Garden Inn.  I wasn’t sure I could pull off anything that big, but with a vote of confidence from Borough President Oddo, and my Mom supporting my vision, it happened.  150 people showed up, and we raised over $12,000.  True to my word, half of the money went to the Global Genes Project, and the other half went to the PTEN Foundation.

This year, I invited Bob Jackson, my favorite entertainer from Walt Disney World, to come and play piano at “Jeans for Rare Genes 2.”  He is here with us today and I am so excited!  We also have “Charlie Balloons,” back to help us again, and lots of great raffles from generous donors.  This year, I think and hope we can raise a lot of money to send to the PTEN Foundation and the Global Genes Project. 

One of the hardest parts of having a Rare Disease is one I don’t like to talk about too much.  Middle school is tough enough, but when you spend more time at the doctor than at social gatherings, it gets tougher to fit in.  I am glad that with Cowden’s Syndrome I don’t “look” sick, except it makes it even harder for people to understand why my life is so different.

I’ve gained an appreciation for the reality that “everyone has something,” and I work hard at not judging others, because everyone is fighting their own battle.  I want to make more people aware that this is the case, and that is why raising awareness for Rare Diseases is so important to me.

The pressure of life, the surgeries, the hospitals, the worrying, the waiting, and the wondering, has done a lot to make me who I am.  I don’t wish for anyone else to really understand this pressure, but I sometimes wish more people would understand me.

I have met a handful of people along the way, some in the most unlikely places.  These people have provided me support through the pressure, and I am forever grateful.

I know I still have a lot of time to grow into the person I am supposed to be.  I love swimming, and drama and singing.  I do well in school, and I love being with my friends.  I love helping others.  I will continue to search out my “Corner of the Sky.”

As you watch the video I have prepared for you, you will see that despite the pressure of life, I will not ever be defined by my disease.  I am determined to focus on a brighter future, and to channel my energy into making a real difference in this world.

I look forward to seeing what the future hold, and how the next chapter in my life turns out.  I hope to see you at our event next year!

When you’re through reading take the time to appreciate her video, created by herself!

“BE the Change You Wish to See in the World” – Ghandi

be the change

With another fall season upon us, life is in full blown crazy mode.  And, to be honest, we wouldn’t have it any other way.

Yesterday, my 12 year old FINALLY throughly enjoyed a Halloween.  It was such a thrill to watch.  FINALLY, she was able to trick or treat, EAT a few treats, AND keep up with some serious walking with friends.

Of course, she slept until almost 1 pm, even with the time change, and woke up unable to move her AVM knee.  These are the repurcussions we expect.  She is not “normal,”  but when she can pretend for a while when it really counts… well that is a great success.  And even as she lay still most of the day, she smiled.  She sang.  Joy.

Fall is full of things, and so far she’s managing nicely.  With a marking period to end Friday, Pupil Path tells me grades are at an all time high.  Practice 4 times a week has her swim times at an all time low.  And, drama twice a week is leaving hopeful anticipation as “The Wizard of Oz” is soon to be cast.

She is working with me to plan our second fund raiser in February.  We chose a date close to World Rare Disease Day, with the continued desire, and intention to bring awareness to our rare disease, and over 7,000 rare diseases worldwide that affect 10% of the world’s population.  We are acutely aware that to be heard, we need to join collective voices.  Individually we matter little to most of the healthcare system, overwhelmed, uneqipped to diagnose and treat us.  Together is the only way we have a chance.

Last year we raised over $12,000 and donated it to the PTEN Foundation (www.PTENfoundation.org) and the Global Genes Project (www.GlobalGenes.org).  This year we hope to exceed $20,000 in donations.

We have brought in Bob Jackson, a performer from Walt Disney World.  He will be flying up to entertain our guests.  Our whole family LOVES Bob, but Meghan especially will not hear of celebrating a birthday until Bob sings to her.  We’ve spent her last 8 birthdays at Disney.

Here is a youtube video that is a great indicator of the FUN time Bob brings!

We have lined up sound with Partners in Sound, and we have Balloon Charlie returning to also help entertain the children.

We have established a children’s menu in hopes that families can enjoy the afternoon out together.

There will be raffles and lots of laughing.

There will be comfortable JEANS and good friends.

We are setting up a facebook group called Jeans for Rare Genes 2016 Staten Island, and we encourage you to join.

We have tickets to the event available through Jeans For Rare Genes 2 – Tickets and Donations link

Meghan is living life as a 12 year old who just happens to have had 15 surgeries.  She is a 12 year old who just happens to have a Rare Disease.  She is a 12 year old who realizes that as challenging as life is, so many others suffer worse.  She is my hero.  She is MY role model.

Together we will make Jeans for Rare Genes a thrilling success.  Hope to see you there!

Time with
Time with “BOB” our favorite entertainer…